Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS News for 2017

Dmitry Berenson Helps Robots Play Nice with People (with Video)

Prof. Dmitry Berenson wants robots to help us out anywhere, any time. In order to do so, he's working with state of the art equipment to design algorithms for robotic manipulation. These algorithms could turn a hunk of metal into a useful household assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics  

Breakthrough for Large Scale Computing: Memory Disaggregation Made Practical

CSE researchers have introduced Infiniswap, the first system to scalably implement cluster-wide memory disaggregation, whereby the memory of all the servers in a computing cluster is transparently exposed as a single memory pool to all the applications in the cluster. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Shin, Kang G.  Software Systems  

New Computer Chips That See Data Will Enable Energy-Efficient Supercomputers

Drawing inspiration from how mammalian brains process sight, Prof. Wei Lu has found a way to mimic the functions of biological neural networks on a next-gen memristor chip. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Neuromorphic Chips Offer Neural Networks That Actually Work Like the Brain

Engineers at the University of Michigan are onto something rather more brainlike, however, with help from a peculiar electrical component known as a memristor. They've developed a new "sparse coding" algorithm that uses grids of memristors to approximate the pattern recognition abilities of mammalian brains. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Alum Dennis Grimard Delivers Commencement Address at Vermont Tech Graduation

Dennis Grimard (MSE PhD EE 1984 1990), a Barre, Vt., native, contributed greatly to the construction of U-M's Lurie Nanofabrication Facility, and now works as the associate director of MIT's nanofabrication lab, MIT.nano. During his address, Dennis choked up as he described his background. He came from a line of farmers, quarry workers and small-business owners who were "always willing to give more than they take," he said. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Next-gen computing inspired by biology

Inspired by how mammals see, a new memristor computer circuit prototype developed by Prof. Wei Lu has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude faster and with much less power than todays most advanced systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Lifelong Radiation Lab Researcher Valdis Liepa Retires

Dr. Valdis V. Liepa, research scientist in ECE, retired from active faculty status on January 31, 2017. Dr. Liepa has been a member of the U-M family for his entire career, earning his BS , MS, and PhD in EE (1958, 1959, and 1966, respectively), and joining the Radiation Laboratory in 1968. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Won Pyo Hong, President of Samsung SDS, Presented with Inaugural ECE Alumni Impact Award

Dr. Won Pyo Hong (MSE PhD EE ), President of Samsung SDS, was presented the first annual ECE Alumni Impact Award. This honor, established in 2017, recognizes Dr. Hong for his pioneering work in the personal electronics industry, playing a key role in shaping our world. It is the highest recognition granted by ECE to its alumni. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  

CSE Receives NCWIT Award for Recruiting and Retention Efforts of Women in Computing

The Computer Science and Engineering Division has received a NCWIT Extension Services Transformation (NEXT) Award for excellence in promoting women in undergraduate computing. Sponsored by the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) and Google, the NEXT Awards honor academic departments that show significant positive outcomes in increasing womens meaningful participation in computing education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Brian Noble Named Chair of Computer Science and Engineering

Influential educator and computer scientist Brian Noble has been selected as the new chair of the Computer Science and Engineering division of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Noble, Brian  

U.S. Hospitals Not Immune to Crippling Cyber Attacks

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu comments on the vulnerabilities that exist in hospital and healthcare systems and devices. The recent strike by the ransomware program called WannaCry demonstrates that these shortcomings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Health  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

Apple Just Acquired This Little-Known Artificial Intelligence Startup

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  

Apple acquires AI company Lattice Data, a specialist in unstructured dark data, for $200M

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  

Smartphone security hole: "Open port" backdoors are common

The College of Engineering reports on work by computer science security researchers which has revealed that so-called "open ports" are much more vulnerable to security breaches than previously thought. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Picting, not Writing, is the Literacy of Todays Youth

This blog post by Thurnau Prof. Elliot Soloway and his collaborator Cathie Norris looks at the disconnect between existing instructional materials (90% text) and how K-12 students communicate and consume (90% image-based), with ramifications for educational practices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Babak Parviz One of 20 Alumni Honored with U-M Bicentennial Award

The University of Michigan presented alumnus Babak Parviz (MSE PhD EE 97 01; also MS Physics 97) with a Bicentennial Alumni Award for his pioneering technological innovations that augment human potential and improve peoples lives. Babak is one of 20 alumni to earn this exclusive award, and one of 10 to accept it at the spring commencement ceremony. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Sister cell profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

In work that could improve understanding of how cancer spreads, a team of engineers and medical researchers at the University of Michigan including Prof. Euisik Yoon developed a new kind of microfluidic chip that can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip and release single cells on demand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Yoon, Euisik  

Shai Revzen part of a new five-institution MURI focused on the control of dynamic systems

Prof. Shai Revzen is a member of a five-institution team that will take advantage of recent advances in computation to exploit the promise of the Koopman Theory for modeling and control of dynamic systems.

The research is funded under a $6.25 million, five-year Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI) based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and called From Data-Driven Operator Theoretic Schemes to Prediction, Inference and Control of Systems (DDOTS to PICS). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Lab-Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

2017 ISCA Influential Paper Award for Groundbreaking Research in Power-efficient Computing

For their groundbreaking research in power-efficient computing, faculty and former students of the department received the 2017 ACM SIGARCH and IEEE-CS TCCA ISCA Influential Paper Award. The researchers developed a method to intelligently put parts of a computer's memory into a low power mode to save energy. Since 2002, the technique has been adopted by major chip manufacturers, and has continued to be exploited in subsequent research by the authors themselves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Mudge, Trevor  

Wellman and Rajan on the Ethics of Automated Trading

In this audio interview at Algocracy and the Transhumanist Project, Prof. Michael Wellman and Business Administration Prof. Uday Rajan comment on the ethics of autonomous trading agents on financial markets. The discussion encompasses algorithmic trading, high frequency trading, market manipulation, the AI control problem, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

U-M Optics Researchers Sponsor Optics and Photonics Industry Snapshot

Professionals and researchers from across Michigan's optics industry gathered for the Optics and Photonics Industry Snapshot on March 27, celebrating both the Optical Society of America's 100th anniversary and the Ann Arbor chapter's 50th. The event was sponsored in part by the Optical Society at the University of Michigan (OSUM), advised by research scientist John Nees. Prof. Aghapi Mordovanakis (BME) was also part of the planning of the event. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Nees, John A.  Optics and Photonics  

Thomas B. A. Senior Named Fellow of International Union of Radio Science

Professor Emeritus Thomas B. Senior, known internationally for his work in scattering and electromagnetics, has been named a fellow of the International Union of Radio Science. The URSI coordinates international exchange and study of all aspects of electromagnetic fields and waves, and fellowship is by invitation only. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Senior, Thomas B. A.   

Hundreds of popular Android apps have open ports, making them prime targets for hacking

This article reports on the work done by CSE researchers Yunhan Jack Jia, Qi Alfred Chen, Yikai Lin, Chao Kong, and Prof. Z. Morley Mao in characterizing a widespread vulnerability in popular Android apps. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Rackham Student Spotlight: Elizabeth Dreyer

Liz is a Rackham Merit Fellow and has always been intentional about her status as a first generation college student, wanting to find whatever ways to increase her chance for success as much as possible. Liz examines magneto-electric scattering, shining high-powered lasers and controlling input light to focus on the scattered light and determine whats happening to the material, particularly exploring what makes one material better than another. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Students in EECS 556 Win Prizes for Improving Image Processing Techniques for Camera Motion Blur and Facial Recognition

Two teams earned prizes in the graduate level course, EECS 556: Image Processing, thanks to the sponsorship of KLA-Tencor. The course, taught this past term by Prof. Boklye Kim (Radiology, EECS), covers topics in the theory of multidimensional signal analysis and processing with applications in optical, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance images. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  Undergraduate Students  

Open Ports Create Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

This article reports on work by CSE researchers who have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data by using open ports to create backdoors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hacking with Sound Waves

CSE researchers have demonstrated a new way of using sound to interfere with devices containing accelerometers, such as smartphones and self-driving cars. This presents a new avenue for hackers to use in compromising devices to steal information or disrupt communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

An Obscure Flaw Creates Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

CSE researchers have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data, and also to install malware and to perform malicious code execution which could be used in large-scale attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Gopal Nataraj Earns Best Paper Award for Improving MRI

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in ECE, earned a Best Student Paper award at the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging for his paper "Dictionary-Free MRI Parameter Estimation Via Kernel Ridge Regression." Gopal is working to improve the sensitivity of MRIs to specific disorders as well as improving doctors' ability to distinguish closely-related disorders. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Health  Lab-Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Student teams earn prizes for analog-digital converter circuit designs in EECS 511

Students in the graduate level course, Integrated Analog/Digital Interface Circuits (EECS 511), taught by Prof. Michael Flynn, competed for cash prizes while presenting their final design projects thanks to the support of Analog Devices, Inc. Two winning projects and teams were determined by an expert panel at Analog Devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Flynn, Michael  Graduate Students  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Prof. Andy Yagle Retires After a 32-Year Career in Signal and Image Processing

Prof. Andy Yagle will retire in May after 32 years at the University of Michigan distinguished by his dedication to teaching as well as contributions to research in the area of signal and image processing. A nearly lifelong Ann Arbor resident, Andy is as Maize and Blue as they come. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Yagle, Andrew E.  

Heath Hofmann Recognized for Excellence in Teaching with the Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Award from the College of Engineering

Prof. Heath Hofmann was honored to receive the Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Award for Excellence in Teaching. This award, previously limited to faculty in other departments, was opened up to the entire College of Engineering faculty for the first time. Prof. Hofmann specializes in power electronics and electromechanical energy conversion. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Hofmann, Heath  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Power and Energy  

Award-Winning Graduate Student Instructors & Instructional Aides

To celebrate the contributions of our graduate and undergraduate instructors, the department selects the best of the best, based on student evaluations, and celebrates them at a special awards ceremony. This event occurred Wednesday, April 26, 2017, when 14 students were recognized for their skill, passion, and care for the students they were charged to assist during the past academic year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

EECS 280 Becomes Third Largest Course at U-M

With almost 1000 students enrolled, EECS 280: Programming and Introductory Data Structures, is a core CS class that has grown in popularity. Course enrollment has increased by almost 200 students in just one year, making it the third largest course for the winter 2017 semester at U-M, and the largest course in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Mary Lou Dorf Named U-M Collegiate Lecturer

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf has been selected for distinction through the U-M Collegiate Lecturer Program. She has made notable contributions to instruction through her reimagining of EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, and has also been involved in a years-long program to expand the reach of the computer science program offered through the College of LSA. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Behzad Yektakhahi Earns Paper Award for Research in Seeing Through Walls

ECE PhD student Behzad Yektakhah earned an honorable mention in the 2017 IEEE Antennas and Propagaation Society Student Paper Competition for his paper, "All Directions Through the Wall Imaging Using Omnidirectional Bi-static FMCW Transceivers." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Parag Deotare Voted HKN Professor of the Year for ECE

Prof. Parag Deotare was named the 2016-2017 HKN Professor of the Year in ECE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Deotare, Parag  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Undergraduate Students  

James Juett Voted HKN Professor of the Year for CSE

EECS students voted, and Dr. James Juett was named the 2016-2017 HKN Professor of the Year in CSE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Juett, James  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2017: Self-Driving Cars: Perception & Control

Course No.: EECS 498-009
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Matthew Johnson-Roberson
Prerequisites: Programming skills in Python & MATLAB, Some C++

Course Description:
This course will teach the theoretical underpinnings of self-driving car algorithms and the practical application of the material in hands-on labs. Highlights will include field trips to M-City, a 32-acre autonomous vehicle site on the U's North Campus, demos and rides in full size autonomous vehicles, and small group work with a competition where students test their own self-driving car algorithms. [More Info]

Mary Lou Dorf Selected for Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf has been selected as a recipient of the 2017 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize, which recognizes faculty who have made use of innovation to improve student learning. She has been recognized for her work in reimagining EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Fall 2017: EECS 598-004 Laser Plasma Diagnostics

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Louise Willingale
Prerequisites: EECS 537 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
High power laser pulses are used to both create and diagnose high-energy density systems. In this course, we will discuss the techniques used for creating, characterizing and timing high power laser pulses from megajoule-nanosecond pulses to relativistic-intensity femtosecond pulses. We will explore the diagnostics used to characterize high-energy density plasmas through optical and other radiation measurements as well as backlighting techniques. Other important aspects of performing experiments, such as target positioning techniques, will be touched on. In addition to the material discussed in lectures, students will consider real experimental data and recent research publications to learn analysis techniques, gain appreciation for physical limitations (such as instrument resolution and background signals), and comparison with theoretical models. This course is suitable for graduate students studying plasma physics, optics and laser science and other related areas. [More Info]

Tony England receives Susan B. Anthony Campus Award

University of Michigan-Dearborns Commission for Women honored College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) Dean Tony England during the organizations annual Susan B. Anthony Awards Dinner on April 4. England received the Susan B. Anthony Campus Award in recognition of his longstanding commitment to the advancement of women and girls in the fields of science and engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  England, Anthony W.  

Fall 2017: VLSI for Signal Processing and Communication Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Hun-Seok Kim
Prerequisites: See instructor

Course Description:
This course will survey methodologies to design energy efficient and/or high-performance VLSI systems for the state-of-the-art image/audio processing, machine learning, and wireless communication systems. The primary focus of the course is on designing hardware efficient algorithms and energy-aware VLSI IC architectures to deliver the performance and efficiency requiredby various signal processing applications. The course will be a mix of lectures and student-led presentations/projects. The content will be suitable for senior undergraduates or graduate students interested in hardware-efficient signal processing algorithms andtheir VLSI implementations. [More Info]

MICDE Grant Funds Renewable Power Research

Prof. Johanna Mathieu is working on one of four projects in computational science that earned a Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering Catalyst Grant, an award of $75,000. Mathieu is participating in a project titled "Computational Energy Systems," which will develop new algorithms for the U.S. electrical power grid that integrate renewable energy sources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Sustainability  

Courage to Resist: The High-Stakes Adventures of J. Alex Halderman

This story by Randy Milgrom at the UM College of Engineering profiles Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his work in the area of Digital Democracy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Why India Needs A Paper Trail For Free And Fair Elections

This article in the Indian edition of the Huffington Post, references the work that Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators did in 2010 to demonstrate vulnerabilities in India's "tamper-proof" electronic voting machines. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Jack Kosaian Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Recent graduate Jack Kosaian (BSE CS 16) has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies in computer science and engineering. He currently works with Professor Mosharaf Chowdhury on developing systems to mitigate load imbalance for data-intensive systems (EC-Cache, OSDI16), and to reduce communication overhead in performing analytics over geographically distributed datasets. [Full Story]

Vishal Giare Named Air, Missile Defense Mission Area Lead at Johns Hopkins APL

ECE alum Vishal Giare (MS EE:S 97), formerly a program area manager at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, has been appointed as APLs mission area executive for air and missile defense. He now leads the laboratorys efforts to develop ballistic missile defense and anti-air warfare systems for U.S. forces and allies, APL said Thursday. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Need a job? How about engineering a driverless car?

As Michigan accelerates toward leadership in the emerging driverless car technology, industry experts say its workforce needs to catch up. Gov. Rick Snyder signed legislation in December allowing the public to buy and use fully self-driving cars when they are available. Jessy Grizzle, the director of Michigan Robotics, said the problem of finding talent in self-driving cars lies in the lack of integrated capability to develop the industry. But that is also where the solution lies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Grizzle, Jessy  

EE Sophomore Takes on W8UM Amateur Radio Club Leadership

The W8UM Amateur Radio Club welcomed new leadership for the 2017-2018 shool year. Kit Ng (N9KIT), a Chicago native, will serve as president. Kit is pursuing a degree in Electrical Engineering, and obtained his first amateur ham radio license in 2014. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Open Ports Act As Security Wormholes Into Mobile Devices

Computer science and engineering researchers at the University of Michigan have for the first time characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data, and also to install malware and to perform malicious code execution which could be used in large-scale attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Andrew Quinn Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Graduate student Andrew Quinn has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies in computer science and engineering at the University of Michigan. Andrew's research creates cluster-scale systems that allow developers to quickly understand and debug programs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

ECE Alumnus Kevin Johnson Receives IEEE-USA Award for Distinguished Public Service that is Expected to Help Tech Employees

Kevin Johnson (BSE EE) received the IEEE-USA Award for Distinguished Public Service "For sustained leadership in furthering reform of noncompete agreements in employment contracts." Kevin is working along with the New England Venture Capital Association on legislation to help employees and the Massachusetts economy by banning noncompete agreements. He says that these agreements reduce Massachusetts employee job mobility and income. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

2016-17 Undergraduate Student Awards

Students, parents, and faculty gathered on Friday, March 24, 2017 to celebrate the achievements of EECS students who earned a special award for academic achievement, research, service, or entrepreneurial activities. Khalil Najafi, Chair for Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Peter Chen, Interim Chair for Computer Science and Engineering, presented the awards. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

ECE Alumni in Academia

ECE alumni are educating the next generation of innovators all around the world! Check out many of our active alumni in academia. Please contact us to let us know of any we are missing! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Nowruz Celebration 1396: Persian New Year Festival

Over 200 students and faculty celebrated Nowruz, the Persian New Year, on March 21 with traditional food, calligraphy, and musical performances. This is the first ECE Nowruz celebration, and it's part of ECE's growing tradition of recognizing the cultural events of its diverse student body. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  

Fall 2017: Quantum Nanotechnology

Course No.: EECS 498-003
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Duncan Steele
Prerequisites: MATH 215/216, PHYSICS 240, co-req of EECS 230

Course Description:
This course aims to introduce students to basic concepts in quantum physics that are relevant to novel device concepts. [More Info]

University researchers develop ultra-thin silver film to improve touch-screen technology

Prof. Jay Guo's research team succeeded in creating a tarnish-proof silver film whose properties allow for various uses such as high-tech screens. The teams paper, published last Monday, details the films versatility. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

Nilmini Abeyratne Selected for the Lipschutz, Ayers Host and Olcott Smith Award

The Rackham Graduate School has selected CSE graduate student Nilmini Abeyratne for the Susan Lipschutz, Margaret Ayers Host and Anna Olcott Smith Award. Abeyratne was selected for this award for her contributions towards the success of women and her drive to increase the number of women in science and engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Women in Computing  

Michigan Allots $87 Million to Replace Flints Tainted Water Pipes

Prof. Jacob Abernethy collaborated with Flint officials and colleagues at UM Flint on a study last year that analyzed the Flint water system and the undertaking required to identify and replace lead pipes in homes. He said that the state's just-announced plan for finishing the replacement of thousands of targeted lead pipes in three years seemed possible with enough money and resources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

The next cyberattack could render your anti-virus and encryption software useless

Researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu and CSE graduate student Timothy Trippel have demonstrated a new way of using sound to interfere with devices containing accelerometers, such as smartphones. This presents a new avenue for hackers to use in compromising devices to steal information or disrupt communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Fall 2017: Power System Dynamics and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-008
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 463 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will introduce angle and voltage stability concepts and consider control strategies for improving dynamic performance. It will provide an overview of nonlinear dynamical systems, including geometrical properties of solutions, Lyapunov methods for approximating the region of attraction, and bifurcation analysis. [More Info]

University of Michigan students create app to help with food allergies

Computer science students Ish Baid and Michael Copley have created the Edible Project app, which helps people with special dietary restrictions to find restaurants and meals they can enjoy without worrying about allergies or ingredients. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Chris Peikert Named First-Ever Patrick C. Fischer Development Professor

Associate Professor Chris Peikert has been named the first-ever Patrick C. Fischer Development Professor in Theoretical Computer Science. Peikert's research is dedicated to developing new, stronger mathematical foundations for cryptography, with a particular focus on geometric objects called lattices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

Fall 2017: Beyond CMOS: Emerging Nanotechnologies

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Becky Peterson
Prerequisites: EECS 320 or graduate standing

Course Description:
This course will survey the devices, circuit architectures, and integration challenges facing the semiconductor industry in the "More than Moore" era, using a mix of lectures, discussions, and student-led projects. The content will be suitable for junior/senior undergraduates or graduate students interested in IC design/VLSI or solid state materials and device/nanotechnology. [More Info]

Fall 2017: Introduction to Algorithmic Robotics

Course No.: EECS 498-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Dmitry Berenson
Prerequisites: EECS 280 (EECS 281 and MATH 214 are recommended)

Course Description:
An introduction to the algorithms that form the foundation of robot planning, state estimation, and control. Topics include optimization, motion planning, forward and inverse kinematics, position control, representations of uncertainty, Kalman filters, particle filters, and principle component analysis. Assignments focus on programming a robot to perform tasks in simulation. [More Info]

Fall 2017: Introduction to Distributed Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Harsha Madhlastha
Prerequisites: EECS 482

Course Description:
In this class, you will learn the core principles and techniques that apply to enable low latency and high throughput, maximize reliability, and preserve consistency semantics. [More Info]

U-M Presents Babak Parviz with Bicentennial Alumni Award

Electrical engineer and Google Glass creator Babak Parviz is widely recognized for revolutionizing communication technology through advances in optics, self-assembly, and miniaturized electronics. Now the Vice President of Amazon, U-M gave the award for his pioneering technological innovations that augment human potential, and thus improve peoples lives. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Screens of the future could be made with transparent silver

Prof. Jay Guo just published new research in the journal Advanced Materials that suggests using a seven-nanometer-thick film made of silver could replace indium tin oxide as a transparent conductive surface for touch screens. Indium is growing more expensive as its use increases, so this could be a valuable alternative. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

University presidents: Prepare for global economy

President Mark Schlissel writes with two other Michigan university presidents on the need to prepare graduates to compete in the global market. The article mentions ECE professor Kamal Sarabandi, a world leader in radar sensing whose work is used by NASA and other government agencies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Building More Stable Quadruped Robots: A Dog's Point of View

Research into the gait of dogs may lead to improved design of quadruped robots and how we control their movement. Shai Revzen, a biologist turned roboticist, brings a unique perspective to the study of animals, one thats beginning to be heard by the biological community as well. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

Alumnus Mariesa Crow is Looking to the Future of Power

Mariesa Crow (BSE EE 85),is working to power the future through her research on energy storage and microgrids and her commitment to training the next generation of power engineers. The Fred Finley Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and VP for Research at Missouri S&T, Crow came to Michigan to discuss her work as part of the Michigan Power and Energy Lab Seminar Series [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Grid  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Power and Energy  

How to Build a BigANT Shai Revzen's Critter-Inspired Robots

Want to build your own robot fast and cheap? Shai Revzen is making that easier with his plate and reinforced flexure (PARF) fabrication technique. He used PARF to develop the meter-scale hexapedal robot known as BigANT, whose design files are available to all. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterials

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down by Prof. Jay Guo, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made. It could also help improve computing power, affecting both the transfer of information within a silicon chip and the patterning of the chip itself through metamaterial superlenses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

A Q&A with Alumnus Angela Blanton: VP and CFO at Carnegie Mellon University

Angela Blanton (BSE EE 1993) was recently named vice president for Finance and chief financial officer for Carnegie Mellon University. After graduating from U-M, she worked at Delphi and Chrysler Motors Corp. as an electrical engineer. She then returned to academia to earn her MBA from the Tepper School of Busines at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). We asked her a few questions about her career. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

Timothy Trippel Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Graduate student Timothy Trippel has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies in computer science and engineering at the University of Michigan. His research interests lie in embedded systems and IoT security and privacy for the purpose of building safe and reliable autonomous systems in the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Smartphone Accelerometers Can Be Fooled by Sound Waves

This article features work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators in which they demonstrate a way to take control of or influence devices such as smartphones through the use of sound waves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Video: Tech Time - Software developed to help the blind

This news segment on WDIV TV highlights the work that Dr. David Chesney and his students have done in conjunction with India West, a passionate young woman who lost her eyesight at an early age. Together, they conceptualize and develop technology for the visually impaired. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  Undergraduate Students  

A small team may have just cracked one of the big obstacles facing smart glasses

ECE alumni startup Avegant may have just beat the billion-dollar startup Magic Leap to the first public demonstration of technology that integrates graphics with the real world with depth, so your eyes can focus on virtual objects at different distances. Co-founded by Ed Tang (CTO) and Allan Evans, Avegant first gained fame with their Glyph technology, an all-in-one personal theater. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Virtual Reality  

Computer Science Continues to Be One of the Most Popular and Rewarding Programs at Michigan

Computer science is a fast-growing and highly popular discipline at Michigan. CS students earn the highest median salary in every category of employment tracked by the College of Engineering, and CS is the second-most popular major at the entire university. [Full Story]

Sonic Cyber Attacks Show Security Holes in Ubiquitous Sensors

Sound waves can be used to hack into critical sensors used in a broad array of technologies including smartphones, automobiles, medical devices, and the Internet of Things, according to research performed by Prof. Kevin Fu, Prof. Peter Honeyman, CSE graduate student Timothy Trippel, and their collaborators at the University of South Carolina. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

It's Possible to Hack a Phone With Sound Waves, Researchers Show

This article features work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators in which they demonstrate a way to take control of or influence devices such as smartphones through the use of sound waves. The Department of Homeland Security is expected to issue a security advisory alert for affected chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Ultrashort light pulses for fast 'lightwave' computers

Extremely short, configurable "femtosecond" pulses of light demonstrated by an international team could lead to future computers that run up to 100,000 times faster than today's electronics. Prof. Mack Kira showed that we can control the peaks within the laser pulses and also twist the light. This is a step toward so-called "lightwave electronics" and, in the more distant future, quantum computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kira, Mackillo  Optics and Photonics  Quantum Computing  Quantum Science and Technology  

A Q&A with Ann Stals Getting Down to the Details

Students, alumni, and faculty alike have something to thank Ann Stals for. As ECEs event planner, she has her hands in nearly everything the division does. Hired in August of 2014, her three years has been spent expanding ECEs outreach to students of different cultures, planning alumni meetups around the country, developing camps for high school students, and, most recently, sending current students to local and Silicon Valley companies for an insider look at an engineering workday. [Full Story]

A Q&A with Tomas Mauricio Giving Back

Tomas Mauricio spends a lot of time behind the scenes, but when he steps out front this intern makes a big impression. Helping coordinate events like ECE's Electrify tech camps and the recent ECE Expeditions, participants always remember their cheerful guide. Now he has a year with the division behind him, and Tomas looks forward to working on at least one more round of Electrify this summer. Learn more about Tomas and the varied work he does to help ECE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Students Take an ECE Expedition to Silicon Valley

ECE brought 18 students to San Jose on Sunday, February 26 for the second ECE Expedition. The students, ranging from freshman to doctoral level, spent three days of their spring break learning from professionals in their field and getting a firsthand look at where their degree could take them after graduation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Entrepreneurship  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Optical Magnetism: Photons induce high levels of magnetism in optical materials

Prof. Steve Rand's group at the MURI Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO) have both observed and explained the presence of photon-induced magnetic dipole (MD) scattering (optical magnetism) in certain crystalline materials that is just as intense as ordinary Rayleigh scattering. The experiments show for the first time an alternative way of controlling magnetic properties of materials with light. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Metamaterials  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

SSCS Distinguished Lecturer Edith Beigne on Auto-adaptive digital circuits

Dr. Edith Beign presented the talk Auto-adaptive digital circuits Application to low-power Multicores and ultra-low-power Wireless Sensor Nodes to members of the Michigan Integrated Circuits Laboratory. Dr. Beign came to Michigan as a 2016-17 Distinguished Lecturer under the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society (SSCS) Distinguished Lecturer Program. This program features researchers who are known for the quality and quantity of their research, and are considered to be excellent speakers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Afshari, Ehsan  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Qi Alfred Chen Receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research into Network and System Security

CSE PhD candidate Qi Alfred Chen has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research into network and system security. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Cindy Finelli: Community Building And Envisioning The Future Of Engineering Education Research

Prof. Cindy Finelli was highlighted as a pioneer of engineering education for her work in community building and education research. She is part of a new initiative at U-M to include education research in engineering departments. She is also the Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Sang Won Lee Receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research into Facilitating Collaboration for Creative and Artistic Tasks

CSE PhD candidate Sang Won Lee has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research into the interactive systems that lie at the intersection of music and computer science, with a focus on collaborative music making, live coding, and interactive music. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

ECE Graduate Student Nathan Sawicki Recognized for Outstanding Teaching

Nathan Sawicki received a 2017 CoE Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors. Nate assisted with EECS 216 (Signals and Systems) and EECS 351 (Intro to Digital Signal Processing). He said he was inspired to be a great GSI because he himself had benefited from two award winning GSIs, and knew what a difference they could make in a student's understanding of the material. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

CSE Alumnus Jim Boerkoel Awarded NSF CAREER Grant for Research into Autonomous Systems

CSE alumnus Jim Boerkoel (CSE MS 08, PhD 12), Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at Harvey Mudd College, has been awarded an NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) grant for his project "Robust and Reliable Multiagent Scheduling Under Uncertainty." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

CSE-Based Startup Clinc Receives $6.3M in Funding to Further Develop Intelligent Banking Assistant

Clinc, the cutting-edge artificial intelligence startup founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang along with CSE research fellow Michael Laurenzano and CSE graduate student Johann Hauswald, has announced it has closed a $6.3 million Series A round of financing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Technology Transfer  

Herb Winful Professor of Optics, Friend of the Arts

In a new interview, Prof. Herb Winful discusses the many facets of his career as an educator and researcher. Prof. Winful has made fundamental contributions to nonlinear fiber optics and nonlinear optics in periodic structures. He also discussed the interdisciplinary course he helped create, UARTS 250: Creative Process, and the creative challenges of teaching engineering principles to students of the arts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Optics and Photonics  Student Teams and Organizations  Winful, Herbert  

Azadeh Ansari Receives ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award for Research in GaN-based Electro-acoustic Devices

Dr. Azadeh Ansari received a 2017 ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award for her dissertation, GaN Integrated Microsystems for RF Applications. This award recognizes exceptional dissertations of outstanding scholarly quality in any field of study. The focus of her dissertation was the design, fabrication, and characterization of novel and advanced electro-acoustic devices and integrated micro/nano systems based on Gallium Nitride (GaN). GaN is the material that led to the development of new high-efficiency lighting and was the focus of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2014. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Optoelectronics  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Gopal Nataraj Receives U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to Support High-impact Research in Medical Imaging

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, received a U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research that promises to lead to improved techniqes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program whose research is unusually creative, ambitious and impactful. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

AI Scientists Gather to Plot Doomsday Scenarios (and Solutions)

Michael Wellman, Lynn A. Conway Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, was part of a workshop aimed at worst-possible adverse outcome AI scenarios and how to prevent them. One of the topics discussed was Prof. Wellman's stock market manipulation scenario. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

CSE Graduate Student Pat Pannuto Recognized with CoE Towner Prize

CSE graduate student Pat Pannuto has been selected to receive a 2017 Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors by the College of Engineering for his work in creating C4CS (Computing for Computer Scientists), which introduces core concepts of hands-on software engineering to persons with no prior experience. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Ann Arbor-based Cribspot evolving from listing rentals to managing them

Ann Arbor-based startup Cribspot has evolved from simply listing rentals to now managing more than 100 spaces for property owners across the Midwest. The founders, Tim Jones and Evan Dancer, former Computer Science students, and Jason Okrasinski, a former Ross Business student, all graduated in May 2013 with the same goal in mind, to make the off-campus housing search as easy as possible. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Barzan Mozafari Named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professor

Barzan Mozafari, assistant professor in Computer Science and Engineering, has been named a Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professor. The professorship is awarded to junior faculty members in recognition of outstanding contributions to teaching and research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

Will artificial intelligence ever actually match up to the human brain?

This article asks the question: How long will it be until we have a general artificial intelligence, rathe than silos of narrow, specific AIs? John Laird, the John L. Tishman Professor of Engineering, comments in the article on the challenges involved in identifying capabilities and integrating them together into a general AI. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Laird, John  

Michigan's Millimeter-Scale Computers featured at ISSCC2017, and in IEEE Spectrum

Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester presented a total of 10 papers at the 2017 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). Most were related to their Michigan Micro Mote (M3) computers. Their goal is to make smarter, smaller sensors for medical devices and the Internet of Things that can do more with less energy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Snow science in action

Using high-tech equipment like infrared sensors and low-tech gear like shovels, researchers are trying to determine what remote sensors could best be used on satellites to produce more accurate snowpack measurements around the world. ECE grad student Mohammad Mousavi is working on Grand Mesa with a University of Michigan boom truck parked at the Jumbo Campground by Mesa Lakes and outfitted with a microwave radiometer, one type of snowpack measurement device. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Professor Who Urged an Election Recount Thinks Trump Won, but Voting Integrity Still Concerns Him

This article in the Chronicle of Higher Education includes a Q and A with Prof. J. Alex Halderman on the 2016 presidential election recount and on the challenges ahead for election integrity. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

CASSIE: A Tougher, Lighter Bipedal Robot with Eyes

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Clinc Raises Venture Capital Round of $6.3 million

Clinc, the artificial-intelligence startup founded by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, announced Wednesday morning that it has raised a funding round of $6.3 million. The company's open-source intelligent assistant and machine learning research platform is involved in research programs with Intel Corp., IBM Corp. and the National Science Foundation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Why Some Apps Use Fake Progress Bars

School of Information Professor Eytan Adar is quoted in this article about a technique he calls "benevolent deception" which can increase user's trust in a system. Later in the article, he lays out guidelines for using benevolent deception. Prof. Adar also has an appointment in CSE. [Full Story]

VIDEO: U-M to begin experimenting with bird-inspired robot

The University of Michigan will begin experimenting with the capabilities of a robot inspired by a flightless bird. With two legs, backward facing knee-like joints and a short torso, researchers note that it may remind people a bit of an ostrich. Named CASSIE, the robot comes from Agility Robotics, a startup spun out of Oregon State University. U-M is one of the first organizations to begin testing out CASSIE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Mingyan Liu: Confessions of a Pseudo Data Scientist

Prof. Mingyan Liu gives the lecture "Confessions of a Pseudo Data Scientist" at the Women in Data Science Conference hosted by MIDAS. Prof. Lius research interests include optimal resource allocation, sequential decision theory, incentive design, and performance modeling and analysis, all within the context of communications networks. Her most recent research involves online learning, modeling and mining of large-scale internet measurement data concerning cyber-security, and incentive mechanisms for interdependent security games. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  

Valeria Bertacco Named Arthur F. Thurnau Professor for Contributions to Undergraduate Education

Prof. Valeria Bertacco has been honored for her outstanding contributions to undergraduate education with an Arthur F. Thurnau Professorship. In addition to teaching three key courses in CS and CE for well over a decade, she is a faculty mentor to student groups for undergraduate and graduate women and goes the extra mile to interact with all of her students outside the classroom. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Women in Computing  

Harsha Madhyastha Selected for Google Faculty Award

Prof. Harsha V. Madhyastha has been awarded a 2017 Google Faculty Research Award for his work in enabling the deployment of low-latency web services in the cloud. It is his third research award from Google. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Data Centers  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Software Systems  

Design Automation Conference Technical Program Committee Holds Meeting in Detroit

190 individuals from around the world converged at Detroit for a Technical Program Committee meeting for the 2017 Design Automation Conference (DAC). DAC is the premier conference for electronic design and automation; the Technical Program Chair is Prof. Valeria Bertacco. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Women in Computing  

Memristor Research Highlights Neuromorphic Device Future

Professor Wei Lu is leading an effort to make neuromorphic processor technology a reality. Lus group is focusing on the memristors a two-terminal device that essentially is a resistor with memory that retain its stored data even when turned off that can act like synapses to build computers that can act like the human brain and drive machine learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Brain  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Inside the Recount

This story provides an in-depth, inside view of how the recount effort for the 2016 presidential election - of which Prof. J. Alex Halderman was a primary participant - was sparked, how it came to focus on three states, what the results showed, and what we can learn from it all. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Our Voting System Is Hackable by Foreign Powers

This article reviews the vulnerabilities that currently exist in our voting system. It references Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has stated that he and his students could have changed the results of the November election. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous 'bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Alum Michelle Stock Elected SPIE Fellow for Development of the Photonics Industry

ECE alumna Dr. Michelle Stock (BSE MSE PhD EE 88 90 94) been elected Fellow of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, "for achievements in business development and science policy for the photonics industry." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Optics and Photonics  

Prof. Zetian Mi Elected SPIE Fellow for Contributions to Photonic Devices and Artificial Photosynthesis

Prof. Zetian Mi has been elected Fellow of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics "for contributions to the development of high performance III-nitride nanowire photonic devices, including electrically injected deep UV lasers, full color nanowire LEDs, and high efficiency artificial photosynthesis." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mi, Zetian  Optics and Photonics  

Emily Mower Provost Receives NSF CAREER Award to Develop Emotion and Mood Recognition for Mental Health Monitoring and Treatment

Prof. Emily Mower Provost has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for her research project, "Automatic Speech-Based Longitudinal Emotion and Mood Recognition for Mental Health Monitoring and Treatment." The CAREER grant is one of the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards, conferred for "the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Mower Provost, Emily  

How Powerful AI Technology Can Lead to Unforeseen Disasters

This article reports on a panel discussion on AI ethics and education hosted by the Future of Life Institute. Panelist Prof. Benjamin Kuipers notes that the small decisions that robots make on their own can cause trouble because human programmers may fail to take all of a robot's possible choices into account. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Robotics  

Andrew Quinn Selected for Microsoft Research PhD Fellowship

Andrew Quinn, a graduate student in the Computer Science and Engineering program, has received a Microsoft Research PhD Fellowship for the 2017 - 2019 academic years. The Microsoft Research PhD Fellowship is a two-year fellowship program for PhD students enrolled in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, or Mathematics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flinn, Jason  Graduate Students  

For Black History Month, CSE Spotlights Faculty and Alumni in Academia

In recognition of Black History Month, CSE would like to spotlight faculty and alumni in academia. These six individuals have made a profound impact in the field of computing and they continue to break barriers in academia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Women in Computing  

Innovation is for Finishers

Many researchers are hoping startups will help get their ideas to the marketplace and universities are trying to help. Prof. Stephen Forrest, himself the founder of multiple companies, has helped colleagues get their own projects off the ground through his support for the Michigan Venture Center. Former CSE chair Farnam Jahanian also shares experiences with his founding of Arbor Networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  Forrest, Stephen  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Optics and Photonics  

Michigan has video game heaven thanks to ECE alum David Carter

David Carter (BSE EE ) serves as a reference services librarian and archivist for the U-M Computer and Video Game Archive. The CVGA features over 7,000 titles everything from time-honored favorites such as Pac-Man and Frogger to newer fare, including Call of Duty and Halo on dozens of gaming systems. Carter was previously was a lecturer at Michigans School of Information and is trained as an electrical engineer, specializing in optics and radio waves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Game Design and Development  

Reetuparna Das Receives NSF CAREER Award to Develop In-situ Compute Memories

Assistant Professor Reetuparna Das has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for her research project, In-Situ Compute Memories for Accelerating Data Parallel Applications. The CAREER grant is one of the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards, conferred for "the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Das, Reetuparna  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Women in Computing  

MichiGames Arcade Spotlights, Preserves Student-Built Video Games

The MichiGames Arcade is designed to archive and showcase videogames built by students in EECS 494: Computer Game Design and Development, and by students in the student group Wolverine Soft. It is located on the first floor of the Beyster Building and is available for anyone to try out. [Full Story]

Wolverine Soft's January Game Jam Produces Strong Games, Three Winners

Wolverine Soft, the student group dedicated to the development of video games at Michigan, held its third 48-hour game jam of the 2016-17 academic year, entitled "Space Jam 3," on the weekend of January 13-15. A number of great games were created; three were declared winners! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

CSE and Local Community Turn Out For Science on Screen Movie and Lecture

On Wednesday, January 25, the U-M CSE and local Ann Arbor communities turned out for a special Science on Screen event at downtown Ann Arbor's Michigan Theater. The program included a screening of I Voted? and a lecture by Prof. J. Alex Halderman on security risks in America's election system and his analysis of the results from the 2016 presidential election recounts, which he helped to organize. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Tea beyond the cup

Young Mountain Tea, Fulbright scholar, and ECE alum Adhiraj Vable's (BSE EE ) start-up in Oregon works to create sustainable livelihoods for rural communities in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Sustainability  

A Q&A with Rhonda Franklin Connecting Diverse Students

ECE alumnus Rhonda Franklin uses her influence as a faculty member at the University of Minnesota to attract a diverse student population to the STEM field, and her own field of applied electromagnetics. She believes the best research results are achieved from a diversity of backgrounds, something she learned as a graduate student at Michigan and fosters in her own research group at Minnesota. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Diversity and Outreach  MEMS and Microsystems  

Dr. David Paoletti Selected to Receive CoE Thomas M. Sawyer, Jr. Teaching Award

Dr. David Paoletti has been selected to receive the 2016 2017 CoE Thomas M. Sawyer, Jr. Teaching Award. This award recognizes non tenure-track faculty who have demonstrated sustained excellence in instruction and guidance at the undergraduate levels. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Paoletti, David  

Z. Morley Mao Receives CoE George J. Huebner, Jr. Research Excellence Award

Prof. Z. Morley Mao has been selected to receive the George J. Huebner, Jr. Research Excellence Award from the College of Engineering for her work in the areas of mobile computing, security, networking, distributed systems, SDN, and cloud computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  

Alfred O. Hero Receives CoE Stephen S. Attwood Award

Al Hero, John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor and R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, received the 2016-2017 Stephen S. Attwood Award, which is the highest honor awarded to a faculty member by the College of Engineering. It recognizes "extraordinary achievement in teaching, research, service, and other activities that have brought distinction to the College and University." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Systems  

Wei Lu Receives CoE David E. Liddle Research Excellence Award

Prof. Wei Lu received the 2016-2017 David E. Liddle Research Excellence Award from the College of Engineering for his contributions to computing systems with his memristors, neuromorphic circuits, and RRAM.Prof. Lu is an internationally recognized leader in the development of memristors for memory and logic applications. He has also developed nanowire transistors suitable for flexible electronics and optoelectornics, and conducts research into other emerging electrical devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  

Mingyan Liu Receives CoE Monroe-Brown Foundation Service Excellence Award

Prof. Mingyan Liu received the 2016-2017 Monroe-Brown Foundation Service Excellence Award from the College of Engineering for her significant and impactful service contributions in the academic and professional community, particularly in the recruitment and retention of female students and faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  

David C. Munson Jr. named president of Rochester Institute of Technology

David C. Munson Jr. was named president of Rochester Institute of Technology. Munson joined Michigan in 2003 to become Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He immediately made an impact on student relations and undergraduate education, supporting the interaction between the arts and engineering, and on the lighter side, giving us three years of memorable Halloween costumes. His forward-thinking vision for the future of engineering was recognized by the University when he was named Dean of the College of Engineering in 2006, a position he held for 10 years. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Munson Jr., David C.  

2017 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2017 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Marcus Darden, Almantas Galvanauskas, Atul Prakash, and Euisik Yoon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Darden, Marcus  Galvanauskas, Almantas  Prakash, Atul  Yoon, Euisik  

Sensors from Head to Toe Todd Coleman Makes Measuring Health Simpler

Prof. Todd Coleman (BSE CE, EE ) thinks theres a way on the horizon for patients in need of regular monitoring to get out of their hospital beds. His group at the University of California San Diego is tackling the challenging problem of getting high-fidelity monitoring to work affordably at home. To answer this need, he and his group have created sensors as thin as skin that can gather data from nearly anywhere. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Flexible electronics  Health  Sensors  Winful, Herbert  

The 2016 US Election Wasnt Hacked, but the 2020 Election Could Be

Prof. Alex Halderman is quoted in this article which reports on the recent Chaos Communication Congress. "Developing an attack for one of these machines is not terribly difficult," says Prof. Halderman. "I and others have done it again and again in the laboratory. All you need to do is buy one government surplus on eBay to test it out." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

CSE Alumnus Peter Wurman Named VP of Engineering at Cogitai

Cogitai, the artificial intelligence start-up focused on next generation machine learning technologies, has announced that Peter Wurman (MSE ME 88, MS CSE 96, PhD CSE 99) has joined the company as Vice President of Engineering. Wurman is also a member of the CSE National Advisory Board. Cogitai was cofounded by Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Poker Is the Latest Game to Fold Against Artificial Intelligence

Prof. Michael Wellman is quoted in this article on new AI systems that are able to best top-level human opponents in games of poker. "What's really new for such a complex game is being able to effectively compute the action to take in each situation as it is encountered, rather than having to work through a simplified form of the entire tree of game possibilities offline," says Prof. Wellman. Prof. Wellman is also quoted on the same subject in this article in Wired. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Becky Peterson Receives NSF CAREER Award for Research in Amorphous Semiconductors for Next Generation Electronics

Prof. Becky Peterson was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project entitled Band Engineering in Amorphous Semiconductors." She will develop new alloys of amorphous oxide semiconductors with precisely tuned semiconductor energy band structures in order to enable new categories of electronic and opto-electronic devices. This research is applicable to the next generation of high-power electronics and deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices, with specific applications in renewable energy and health care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optoelectronics  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Prof. Kevin Fu to deliver endowed Dr. Dwight Harken Memorial Lecture on medical device security

Prof. Kevin Fu has been selected to give the annual Dwight E. Harken Lecture during the AAMI 2017 Conference & Expo in Austin, TX, June 912. Prof. Fu directs the Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security and the Security and Privacy Research Group at Michigan and is also CEO and chief scientist of Virta Labs, Inc. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

LNF User Symposium - Sharing Ideas and Celebrating Innovation

The 2016 Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF) User Symposium highlighted the cutting-edge research enabled by Michigan's world-class facility. The Symposium included technical talks, a poster session, and the opportunity for discussion and networking. Four ECE grad students won prizes for their posters, and Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the event's keynote address. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Kushner, Mark J.  LNF  Plasma Science and Engineering   

Five things that got broken at the oldest hacking event in the world

Chaos Communications Congress is the world's oldest hacker conference, and Europe's largest. Every year, thousands of hackers gather in Hamburg to share stories, trade tips and discuss the political, social and cultural ramifications of technology. This story quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who with his student Matt Bernhard, has studied the security of the past US presidential election. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Kamal Sarabandi | Remote Sensing Science and Technology

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi delivered a Geoscience Remote Sensing Seminar, titled "Remote Sensing Science and Technology in Support of Exploration and Safe Utilization of Energy Resources." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mark Kushner | The Role of Plasma Modeling

Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the Keynote Address at the 2016 LNF Users Symposium, titled The Role of Plasma Modeling in the Innovation Cycle for Nanofabrication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

New Courses Offered by ECE: Winter 2017

As technology changes and advances, so does the range of courses offered by our faculty. The following courses being offered to students for the Winter 2017 term include completely new courses as well as nearly-new courses that may soon become a regular part of the curriculum. They are all being offered by faculty uniquely qualified to teach the courses. The faculty bring extensive experience based on their own research in these areas. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Berenson, Dmitry  Course  Forrest, Stephen  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Grbic, Anthony  Hiskens, Ian  Islam, Mohammed  Kira, Mackillo  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  Revzen, Shai  Scott, Clayton D.  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

EE Student Noah Mitchell-Ward Earns PES Scholarship to Support Studies in Renewable Power

Noah Mitchell-Ward, undergraduate electrical engineering student, has been named a future power and energy leader by the IEEE Power & Energy Society, which recently awarded him a Power & Energy Society (PES) Scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year. This $2000 scholarship recognizes outstanding students committed to exploring the power and energy field. Noah is interested in renewable energy sources, and hopes to work with solar or wind generation and battery energy storage. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Undergraduate Students  

EE Student Leonard Kapiloff Earns PES Scholarship to Support Studies in Secure, Sustainable Grid

Leonard Kapiloff, undergraduate electrical engineering student, has been named a future power and energy leader by the IEEE Power & Energy Society, which recently awarded him a Power and Energy Society (PES) Scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year. This $2000 scholarship recognizes outstanding students committed to exploring the power and energy field. Leonard is also earning a minor in Energy Science and Policy. Leonard wants to work in the energy industry towards a more sustainable and secure electric grid. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Undergraduate Students  

EE Student Arun Nagpal develops new ENG 100 section to spotlight space science

For incoming freshman, Engineering (ENGR) 100 provides an initial glimpse into the world of collegiate engineering design. Starting this upcoming winter semester, a new ENGR 100 section will be implemented that spotlights previously under-represented topics: atmospheric and space science. Arun Nagpal, electrical engineering junior and co-President of SEDS, saw an opportunity to increase freshman engagement in space research through hands-on course-work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Space technology  Undergraduate Students