Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS News for 2016

Call for Ideas: Recuiting and Retaining Women and Underrepresented Minorities in Computer Science

Girls Encoded is a series of events run by faculty and students at CSE that are aimed at increasing the number of women and underrepresented minorities in computing. Girls Encoded invites the submission of your proposals for initiatives to recruit or retain women and minorities in computer science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Visually Impaired Teen, Engineering Students Create Tech for the Blind

Dr. David Chesney's EECS 481 Software Engineering class helps, and is helped by, India West, a passionate young woman who lost her eyesight at an early age. Together, they conceptualize and develop technology for the visually impaired. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  Undergraduate Students  

Popular Intro CS Course Continues to Grow; Over 870 Students Present Final Projects at Showcase

Over 870 students in EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, displayed their final projects for friends, family, classmates, and industry sponsors in a series of project showcases in the Michigan League Ballroom. The course teaches undeclared students and non-CS majors the fundamentals of algorithmic thinking and programming. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Arthur, William  Dorf, Mary Lou  Undergraduate Students  

Semyon Meerkov Elected Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences

On October 27, 2016, Professor Meerkov was unanimously elected as a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences for his contributions to Systems Science and Automation. The Academy, established in 1774, is the highest scientific institution in Russia. His current work is centered on production systems engineering, quasilinear control, and on the theory of resilient monitoring and control systems, which degrade gracefully under cyber-attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Meerkov, Semyon M.  

Congratulations New ECE PhDs: 2015-2016

Electrical and Computer Engineering conferred 45 PhD degrees in the Fall 2015, Summer 2016, and Winter 2016 semesters. Congrats to all of our outstanding new graduates! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  

Peter M. Chen to Serve as Interim Chair of Computer Science and Engineering

Prof. Peter M. Chen, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, will assume the role of Interim Chair of Computer Science and Engineering effective January 1, 2017. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chen, Peter M.  Lab-Software Systems  

Todd Austin Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Simulation Techniques and Resilient System Design in Computer Architecture

Prof. Todd Austin has been named an IEEE Fellow, Class of 2017, "for contributions to simulation techniques and resilient system design in computer architecture." Prof. Austin is a recognized leader in the area of computer architecture research, having delivered several seminal papers that have changed the landscape of research in the field, and where he is the 12th all-time most sited author and the leader of the field's largest research center. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Prof. Trevor Mudge Named ACM Fellow for Contributions to Power Aware Computer Architecture

Bredt Family Professor of Engineering Trevor Mudge has been elected a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) "for contributions to power aware computer architecture." His inventive approaches have led to new technologies that reduce the energy consumption of microprocessors while maintaining acceptable performance in an era of exponential growth in embedded processors and system-on-chip designs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mudge, Trevor  

Winter 2017: Theory and Practice of Data Compression

Course No.: EECS 553
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: David Neuhoff
Prerequisites: EECS 501, Probability and Random Processes

Course Description:
Data compression (also called source coding) is the process of creating binary representations of data from sources such as speech, images, audio, video or text. This course gives a broad introduction to the theory and practice of lossy compression, where perfect reproductions are not possible or require too many bits (for example for speech, images, audio, video), and some introduction to lossless compression, where perfect reproductions are required (for example for text or other discrete data). Particular attention is paid to compressing images, speech and video.

The lossy compression methods include a number of quantization techniques: scalar, vector, predictive (e.g. DPCM), transform (e.g., JPEG, MPEG, H.26X), subband (e.g., MP3, wavelet, JPEG2000), predictive and adaptive quantizers (e.g., CELP as used in cell phones to compress speech). The theory is mainly high-resolution quantization theory.

The lossless compression methods include Huffman, conditional, run-length, Lempel-Ziv, and arithmetic codes. The theory is entropy theory.

Students gain experience in data compression via a term project.

The course is oriented toward first and second year graduate students. No previous introduction to data compression is presumed. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Channel Coding Theory and Applications

Course No.: EECS 650
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Hessam Mahdavifar
Prerequisites: (Advisory) EECS 501 and MATH 419

Course Description:
Coding theory is the science of the systematic study of structured sets called codes, providing reliable communications and data storage in noisy environments. Today, error-correcting codes are among the fundamental parts of any communication system and data storage system.

The classical approach to construct such structured sets has been to consider certain algebraic objects such as vector spaces and finite fields. In the first part of this course, we cover some required background to study linear binary block codes and algebraic codes over finite fields. In particular, some of the well-known classical codes such as Reed-Solomon codes and BCH codes are studied.

Another approach to construct structured sets or codes has been to exploit properties of certain graphical models and trellises. This approach was essentially born by the invention of convolutional codes in 50s but was mostly discarded till 90s due to the lack of computational power. The invention of turbo codes and the re-discovery of low-density parity-check codes in 90s led to the birth of a new subfield of coding theory called modern coding theory. In the second part of the course, we study some essential aspects of modern coding theory.

A classical goal of information theory set by Shannon 70 years ago has been to construct explicit codes with practical encoder and decoder that achieve the fundamental limit of channel capacity. This goal was finally accomplished by the invention of polar codes in 2009. This has revolutionized the field of coding and information theory as many open problems have been solved using polar codes and the new notion of channel polarization. Besides being asymptotically optimal, polar codes have also been shown to perform very well at short block length which has led to their adoption in 5G wireless communication systems. In the third part of the course, we study polar codes and channel polarization together with practical aspects of their implementation. [More Info]

U-M researchers create helpful tool for Flint residents during ongoing water crisis

This video and text news item describes MyWater-Flint, the app and website designed by UM researchers to help Flint residents with data about the ongoing water crisis. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Prof. Jason Flinn Named ACM Fellow for Contributions to Mobile Computing and Distributed Systems

Prof. Jason Flinn has been elected a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) for contributions to mobile computing and reliable distributed systems. His research is in the area of operating systems, mobile computing, storage, and distributed systems. He is currently interested in creating software systems that allow concurrent programs to execute more reliably on multicore computers, as well as in enabling demanding applications to run on small, mobile computers and smartphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flinn, Jason  Lab-Software Systems  

Professor Emerita Lynn Conway Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Professor Emerita Lynn Conway has been elected Fellow of the American Assocation for the Advancement of Science. Fellows are recognized for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Prof. Conway has made groundbreaking and fundamental contributions to Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) design and production of integrated circuits. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

Kamal Sarabandi Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, has been elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fellows are recognized for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Kamal Sarabandi's contributions have shaped the remote sensing radar imaging field for over the past quarter century. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Google-funded Flint Water App Helps Residents Find Lead Risk, Resources

Faculty and students at Michigan's Ann Arbor and Flint campuses have released an app that provides Flint residents with data about the ongoing water crisis. The app was developed with support from Google.org. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

ECE Team Receives Distinguished Diversity Leaders Team Award

A seven member team from Electrical and Computer Engineering has received the Distinguished Diversity Leaders Team Award, established to shine a light on those staff members who have shown extraordinary commitment and dedication to diversity at U-M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Valeria Bertacco Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Computer-aided Verification and Reliable System Design

Prof. Valeria Bertacco has been named an IEEE Fellow, Class of 2017, "for contributions to computer-aided verification and reliable system design." Prof. Bertacco is a highly noted researcher in the area of computer architecture and is Director of the department's Computer Engineering (CE) Lab. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Women in Computing  

Trump Allowed to Join Fight Against Pennsylvania Recount

A battle over whether or not a recount of ballots cast in Pennsylvania during the recent presidential campaign is taking place. In the case made for a recount, hackers could have easily infected Pennsylvanias voting machines with malware designed to lay dormant for weeks, pop up on Election Day and then erase itself without a trace, according to Prof. J. Alex Halderman. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Yi-Jun Chang Selected for Chia-Lun Lo Fellowship

Yi-Jun Chang, a graduate student in the Computer Science and Engineering program, has received a Chia-Lun Lo Fellowship for 2016-17. The Chia-Lun Lo Fellowship assists assists outstanding students in Rackham programs who have earned a previous degree from a university in Taiwan and who may be ineligible for other kinds of support because of citizenship. Chang's research interest is in complexity theory of distributed computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Pettie, Seth  

Inspiring a New Generation of Women Engineers in Liberia

Six women engineering students from Liberia traveled to the U.S. to attend the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Women in Engineering 2016 conference, under the sponsorship of the Excellence in Higher Education for Liberian Development (EHELD) program and U-M-SWE. They spoke of their passion to improve their country through engineering, as well as the difficulties of being female engineers in their country. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Winful, Herbert  

$1.1 million grant to develop robot emergency response capabilities

The Office of Naval Research has awarded Prof. Dmitry Berenson $1.1 million to help advance a robot's ability to walk over unstable ground and deal with tangles in string, rope or wire. One of the new abilities that Berenson and his group will help robots attain is navigating unfamiliar environments by reusing previous experience from similar environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics  

Stephen Forrest Receives IEEE Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal for Pioneering Work in OLEDs

Stephen Forrest, Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, is the co-recipient of the 2017IEEE Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal, along with Ching W. Tang and Mark Thompson, For their pioneering work on organic devices, leading to organic light-emitting diode displays. The Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal is given for outstanding contributions to material and device science and technology, including practical application. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Video: The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility is a state-of- the-art cleanroom that provides advanced micro- and nano-fabrication equipment and expertise to internal and external researchers. The LNF enables cutting edge research, including semiconductor materials and devices, electronic circuits, solid-state lighting, energy, biotechnology, medical devices and unconventional materials and processing technologies. Learn more in this video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Najafi, Khalil  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  

CubeWorks: Solving Problems with the Worlds Smallest and Lowest-power Computers

CubeWorks, founded by the team at University of Michigan that developed the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), the worlds smallest computer, has been flying under the radar since late in 2013. This startup company specializes in the worlds smallest and lowest-power sensing technology. With its first outside funding from Intel (see the press release), the CEO of CubeWorks is now looking two years into the future, when he hopes to be manufacturing millimeter-scale computing devices for their first customers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Entrepreneurship  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Ushering in the Next Generation of Flat-Panel Displays and Medical Imagers

Research that is expected to directly impact the future of the flat-panel display and imager industries has been selected as an Editor's Choice by the Journal of Solid-State Electronics. The article, co-authored by Prof. Jerzy Kanicki, ECE graduate student Chumin Zhao, and Dr. Mitsuru Nakata, describes a new technology that may help usher in the next generation of flat-panel displays and imagers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Kanicki, Jerzy  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Mount and Wu Scholarship Rewards Extracurriculars

Brian Mount (BSE CE 01, MSE CSE 03), Melissa Wu (BSE Civ 03), and Michelle Wu (BSE ChE 01), have recently endowed the Mount and Wu Families Scholarship. This fund will provide need-based support for in-state, undergraduate students with a preference for those engaged in College of Engineering extracurricular activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Winter 2017: Advanced Topics and the Design of Power Electronics

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Al Avestruz
Prerequisites: EECS 418 and EECS 460 or equivalents

Course Description:
This class will address some advanced topics and techniques in power electronics and the craft of design through case studies. [More Info]

Winter 2017: EECS 598 - Optics and Quantum Spectroscopy of Semiconductors

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Mack Kira
Prerequisites: PHYSICS 240 and (EECS 334 or 434 or 320 or 540)

Course Description:
This lecture will provide a pragmatic and brief introduction to solidstate theory, manybody formalism, and semiconductor quantum optics to explore pragmatic possibilities for nanotechology. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Vote Recount Push Advances, but Reversing Trumps Win Is Unlikely

This article in the New York Times reports on the uneven progress toward recounts in three key states for the recent presidential election. Led by Green Party candidate Jill Stein, the recounts were inspired by a call from leading security experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Want to Know if the Election was Hacked? Look at the Ballots

In this post, Prof. J. Alex Halderman sets the record straight regarding what he and other leading election security experts have actually been saying to the Clinton campaign and everyone else whos willing to listen. He describes a situation where malware could be a factor in the vote totals during the presidential election. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Trump election: Activists call for recount in battleground states

The BBC reports on the call by leading computer scientists, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, for a recount of votes in the presidential election in three swing states. Their analysis shows that Clinton performed worse in counties that relied on electronic voting machines compared to paper ballots and optical scanners. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Computer scientists urge Clinton campaign to challenge election results

CNN reports that a group of top computer scientists, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, have urged Hillary Clinton's campaign to call for a recount of vote totals in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. The computer scientists believe they have found evidence that vote totals in the three states could have been manipulated or hacked and presented their findings to top Clinton aides on a call last Thursday. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Winter 2017: Waves & Imaging in Random Media

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: John Schotland
Prerequisites: Basic partial differential equations; some knowledge of probability theory

Course Description:
This is a special topics course. The focus is on the theory of wave propagation in inhomogeneous media in various asymptotic regimes including: (i) geometrical optics of high-frequency waves (ii) homogenization of low-frequency waves in periodic and random media (iii) radiative transport and diusion theory for high-frequency waves in random media. Applications to inverse problems in imaging will be considered. The necessary tools from asymptotic analysis, scattering theory and probability will be developed as needed. The course is meant to be accessible to graduate students in mathematics, physics and engineering. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Experts Urge Clinton Campaign to Challenge Election Results in 3 Swing States

Leading computer security experts with an interest in election integrity, including Prof. J. Alex Halerman, have called for a recount of the votes cast in the presidential election in three key swing states. They believe they have found evidence that results in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania may have been manipulated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Vulnerable connected devices a matter of "homeland security"

This article describes the security ramifications of unprotected IoT devices such as internet-connected cameras, video recorders on the larger Internet. It quotes Prof. Kevin Fu on the effort that would be required to secure this new ecosystem. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Nader Behdad Receives the Inaugural ECE Rising Star Alumni Award for his Transformative Research in Antennas

Nader Behdad knew from a young age that he wanted to make antennas for a living. The son of an electrical engineer working for a national TV broadcasting company, he often had the chance to accompany his father to work. Now the inaugural recipient of the ECE Rising Star Alumni Award, which recognizes younger ECE alums who have achieved early success within their careers, Prof. Behdad (MS PhD EE 03 06) has tackled some of the toughest problems in antenna research. But unlike his father's work, for his applications, they need to be very small - small enough, even, to be used to treat cancer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Wide-ranging ECE Research Presented at 2016 Engineering Graduate Symposium

Systems to study cancer stem cells, new methods to remotely measure snow and ice thickness, radar for autonomous vehicles, navigation systems that don't rely on GPS, nanowire lasers, and methods to model lithium-ion batteries were just a few of the many winning projects presented by ECE students at the 2016 Engineering Graduate Symposium. Thirteen alumni returned to judge the posters and meet with students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Professor to Congress: "Internet of Things security is woefully inadequate"

As the Internet of Things grows around us, so do the threat of cybersecurity breaches severe enough to shut down hospitals and other vital infrastructure. This is the message that Prof. Kevin Fu delivered to lawmakers at a congressional hearing this week. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Recent Alum Startup Wins $25,000 at Accelerate Michigan Competition

Movellus Circuits, co-founded by alumnus Muhammad Faisal (MSE PHD EE 2011 2014), won $25,000 awards at the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition in Detroit, in the University Research Highlight and People's Choice categories, respectively. Movellus' prize money will go toward more protection for the intellectual property behind its semiconductor chip optimization software, which has already netted three major customers and significant interest from Silicon Valley. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Wentzloff, David  

After Dyn cyberattack, lawmakers seek best path forward

In a hearing hosted by the House Energy and Commerce Committee, University of Michigan professor Kevin Fu, Level 3 Communications Chief Security Officer Dale Drew and computer security luminary Bruce Schneier briefed Congress on the challenges posed by insecure internet-connected devices and whether they believe the government can make a difference. This article provides a summary of the proceedings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

How You Speak To Siri & Alexa Matters More Than You Think Here's Why

Prof. Rada Mihalcea is quoted in this story about sexism and today's virtual assistants such as Amazon's Alexa, Apple's Siri and Microsoft's Cortana. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Video: Prof. Cindy Finelli and Engineering Education Research

Prof. Finelli is currently Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering, and she was founding director at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching in Engineering at Michigan, which supports college-wide initiatives in engineering teaching and learning. Her own research focuses on how faculty make decisions about what theyre doing in the classroom, how students understand engineering concepts, and how a flexible classroom influences both teaching and learning. Watch a new video about her and her work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Regulate cybersecurity or expect a disaster, experts warn Congress

The U.S. government must demand that all internet-connected devices have built-in security, according to experts including Prof. Kevin Fu who warned Congress that the country could soon face a disastrous, lethal cyberattack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Winter 2017: Organic Electronics: Fundamentals

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Steve Forrest
Prerequisites: Senior level quantum physics, electricity and magnetism

Course Description:
In this course, we will trace the history, science and modern applications of organic electronic technology. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Liz Dreyer Earns An Outstanding Collegiate Member Award for Years of SWE Leadership

ECE PhD student Liz Dreyer was awarded the Outstanding Collegiate Member award by the Society of Women Engineers, "for leadership and innovative efforts to grow SWE's presence on campus, particularly among graduate students, and for advancing the overall interests of women in STEM fields across the globe." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Rand, Stephen  Student Teams and Organizations  

Winter 2017: Formal Verification of Hardware and Software Systems

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours:
Instructor: Karem Sakallah
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
This course explores the latest advances in automated proof methods for checking whether or not certain properties hold under all possible executions of a complex hardware or software system. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Multidisciplinary Capstone Design Project - Supplemental Information

Course No.: EECS498-006 and EECS 498-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Anthony Grbic or Greg Wakefield
Prerequisites: See PDF

Course Description:
See attached PDF [More Info]

Winter 2017: Multidisciplinary Capstone (MDE) Design Pilot

Course No.: EECS 498
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Brian Gilchrist
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
EECS students, together with ME and MSE students, work on common, interesting, significant major design experience (MDE) projects. This pilot douse is about providing students real-world, multidisciplinary design project opportunities to satisfy their MDE requirement and for ECE masters students interested in meaningful project experiences.

For WN17, we will have several projects with a biomedical focus as well as energy, sports, spaceflight, and other areas needing EECS students (e.g. sensor/electronics, embedded systems, controls, and wireless). Please contact Prof. Gilchrist with questions. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Internet Foundations

Course No.: EECS 398
Credit Hours: 1 credit
Instructor: Mohammed Islam
Prerequisites: ENGR 101 or EECS 183

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the internet. You use the internet every day, and in this course we permit you to look under the hood of the internet. We start by reviewing the differences between various applications, such as world wide web, skype, and Bit-Torrent. The 4-layer internet model will be explained, which includes the application, transport, network and link layers. Internet protocol and TCP/IP communication will be reviewed, along with a detailed discussion of how packet switching and routers work. The link and physical layer description will include explanations of how WiFi and Ethernet networks work [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility Gets a New Director

Prof. Wei Lu has been named the new director of the Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF), effective September 1, 2016. The LNF is a world class cleanroom facility, open to the public, with over 13,500 sq. ft. of state-of-the-art cleanroom space that provides researchers the ability to fabricate a sweeping array of solid-state materials, devices, circuits, and microsystems using silicon, compound semiconductors, organic, and other emerging materials. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  

Kevin Fu Testifies on the Role of Connected Devices in Recent Cyber Attacks

Prof. Kevin Fu testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee on the role of connected devices in recent cyber attacks on Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016. Follow the link to see a video of the proceedings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Provost and former CSE Assoc. Chair Martha Pollack named president at Cornell University

Former Associate Chair of CSE and Dean of the School of Information Martha Pollack has been named President of Cornell University. Our congratulations! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Pollack, Martha  

Winter 2017: Motion Planning

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Dmitry Berenson
Prerequisites: A linear algebra class and significant programming experience

Course Description:
This course will cover the major topics of motion planning including (but not limited to) planning for manipulation with robot arms and hands, mobile robot path planning with non-holonomic constraints, multi-robot path planning, high-dimensional sampling-based planning, and planning on constraint manifolds. Students will implement motion planning algorithms in open-source frameworks, read recent literature in the field, and complete a project that draws on the course material. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

The Network Standard Used in Cars Is Wide Open to Attack

As automobiles grow increasingly computerized, the security of the network for in-vehicle communication is a growing security concern. New research by Prof. Kang G. Shin and graduate student Kyong-Tak Cho demonstrates that the controller area network (CAN) protocol implemented by in-vehicle networks has a new and potentially quite dangerous vulnerability. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  Shin, Kang G.  

Winter 2017: Social Computing Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Walter Lasecki
Prerequisites: EECS 493 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will be based on reading from the social computing research literature. Practical projects will give students experience using and creating online social computing platforms. A significant team-based final project component will let students gain experience designing and building the types of systems we will study. Students will select a topic, and then propose, design, and build a real system. [More Info]

2016 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition Highlights Outstanding Research

CSE held its thirteenth annual CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition on November 9, 2016. Five students presented on an aspect of their research; Shaizeen Aga was selected as the top presenter this year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Women in Computing  

How Safe is Your Smart Home?

The Smart Home sounds like a great idea. But is it an unsafe home? "I would be cautious, overall," says Prof. Atul Prakash. "The technology is relatively new. Hardware is probably a little bit ahead of the software at this point, and a lot of vulnerabilities we are seeing are primarily on the software side of things." Read more and listen to the full interview here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  

Alumnus Tim Howes Chosen for Arbor Networks PhD Research Impact Lecture and Award

Michigan alumnus Tim Howes (BSE Aero 85, MSE PhD CSE 87 96) has been selected by the College of Engineering for the Arbor Networks PhD Research Impact Award. Dr. Howes' doctoral research focused on Internet directory services, and he co-invented LDAP, the Internet directory protocol, while a graduate student at U-M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Winter 2017: Hands On Robotics

Course No.: EECS 498
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Shai Revzen
Prerequisites: MATH 216 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Take Hands On Robitics, a design course where you learn robotics by building robots using the CKBot modular robot system! Covering concepts in robotics from kinematics, control, to programming. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Quantum Information, Probability and Computing

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Sandeep Pradhan
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
Extended introduction and overview of the field of quantum information, quantum probability and quantum computing [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Grid Integration of Renewable Energy Sources

Course No.: EECS 498/598
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 215 or EECS 314

Course Description:
This course will consider large-scale integration of renewable generation in electricity grids. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Intro Distributed Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-003
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Harsha Madhyastha
Prerequisites: EECS 482

Course Description:
In this class, you will learn the core principles and techniques that apply across various scenarios to maximize performance, reliability, efficiency, etc. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Information Science

Course No.: EECS 398-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Clayton Scott
Prerequisites: MATH 116 and ENGR 101 or equivalent

Course Description:
This course develops the theory of information, and applies that theory to understand several modern technologies for information processing and analysis. [More Info]

Five U-M Programming Teams Compete in ACM Regional Contest; One Advances to World Finals

Five University of Michigan programming teams have competed in the 2016 ACM East Central North America Regional Programming Contest, with one team, the Victors, placing in first at the Grand Valley regional site and third place for the East Central Regional Contest. The Victors will be advancing to the ACM-ICPC World Finals in Rapid City, South Dakota, which will take place May 20 25, 2017. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Compton, Kevin  Lab-Theory of Computation  Radev, Dragomir  Undergraduate Students  

Meera Sampath | The Art & the Science of Innovation

Sampath (PhD EE:S 95) earned the 2016 CoE Alumni Society Merit Award for ECE. She is Vice President for Innovation and Business Transformation for Xerox, Corp. In 2009, she became the first director of the Xerox Research Innovation Hub in India where she was responsible for overseeing its creation as well as guiding its research agenda and establishing Open Innovation partnerships. Check out Meera's talk. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Michael Stonebraker | The Land Sharks are on the Squawk Box

Michael Stonebraker (MSE EE 66, PhD CICE 71) received the 2016 CoE Alumni Medal Award. Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database management systems and founded multiple successful database companies based on his pioneering work. He received the Turing Award "for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems." Check out the talk he delivered on campus [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Databases and Data Mining  

A Lot Of Voting Machines Are Broken Across America (But It's Totally Normal)

Forbes reports on numerous reports of broken machines causing epic queues and peeving voters. Matt Bernhard, CSE graduate student and an expert on the security of electoral systems, says that "This year isn't that different, other than I'm expecting higher turnout which may stress the infrastructure more." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Harsha Madhyastha Selected for Facebook Faculty Award

Prof. Harsha V. Madhyastha has been selected as the recipient of a Facebook Faculty Award for his work in distributed systems and computer networking. His recent research has focused on enabling latency-sensitive web services to optimize user experience. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

US election: Experts keep watch over 'hack states'

"Unless the election is extraordinarily close, it is unlikely that an attack will result in the wrong candidate getting elected," suggest CSE graduate student Matt Bernhard and Prof. J. Alex Halderman. But they say the risk the election process could be disrupted by hackers should be taken extremely seriously. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Nancy Benovich Gilby Chosen as Woman of the Year by Michigan Council of Women in Technology

CSE alumna Nancy Benovich Gilby is the first-ever recipient of the Michigan Council of Women in Technology (MCWT) Foundation's Woman of the Year Award. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Women in Computing  

Next Weeks Anticipated U.S. Election

This article discusses the vulnerabilities of direct recording electronic voting systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his colleagues on the security of DREs. Twenty-nine states still use DREs and five states: Delaware, Georgia, Louisiana, New Jersey and South Carolina, use the easily compromised machines without a paper trail. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

US Election Systems Seen 'Painfully Vulnerable' to Cyberattack

This article sheds light on potential cyberattacks during the U.S election. Some cybersecurity analysts warned that hackers of even moderate talent could possibly throw the results of the 2016 presidential election into chaos. Prof. Halderman hopes all the attention on voting-system vulnerabilities will motivate state governments to invest in cybersecurity for the 2020 elections. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

MHacks Win Propels Student Virtual Reality Startup, Focused on Child Therapy and 3-D Gaming

Propelled by a win at MHacks, EE major Duncan Abbot and English major Paul Stefanski co-founded the startup company Gwydion, a virtual and augmented reality software development company. Early projects range from therapy in children's hospitals to helping materials scientists study 3-D crystals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  Virtual Reality  

Forget rigged polls: Internet voting is the real election threat

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his contemporaries have been tireless in warning us of the security risks associated with internet voting. Will we listen? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

The Security Challenges of Online Voting Have Not Gone Away

This guest post on IEEE Spectrum by CSE graduate student Matthew Bernhard, Prof. J. Alex Halderman, and Robert Cunningham, Chair of the IEEE Cybersecurity Initiative, lays out the details for the case against Internet voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hacking Your Health (video)

What security weaknesses exist in hospitals and health care providers? Prof. Kevin Fu, Director of the University of Michigans Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security, comments on medical device security on CNBC News. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Health  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

How the 2016 Election Could Be Hacked (story+video)

Is our voting system really vulnerable to hackers? Professor of computer science, J. Alex Halderman, explains the situation to VICE News in this segment that originally aired on October 24. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

$800K in Research Awards Aim to Address Data Science

Four research teams from the University of Michigan and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are sharing $800,000 in awards to use data science techniques to address big challenges. Prof. Atul Prakash is co-PI for a project that aims to develop algorithms and mechanism design to incentivize users to charge electric vehicles at appropriate times and locations, leading to better load management, a more reliable grid, and cost savings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  

Michael Flynn Earns U-M Faculty Recognition Award

Prof. Michael Flynn has received a Faculty Recognition Award for his accomplishments in research, teaching, and service to the University. Prof. Flynn is one of the world's premier scholars in the area of analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits and systems, analog-to-digital conversion (ADC), and other interface circuits. His pioneering research and designs have improved the performance and energy efficiency of analog-digital interfaces and transformed the field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flynn, Michael  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Video Friday: Robot Patrol, Tickling Machine, and More From IROS 2016

This IEEE Spectrum collection of research project videos from the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) includes a piece on robot navigation in dynamic social environments from Prof. Edwin Olson's APRIL Lab. To see the Michigan video, scroll to the bottom of the page. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics  

Using cyber security to keep your ballot safe ahead of the presidential election

This TV news segment features an interview with CSE graduate student Matthew Bernhard. He is interviewed about the possibility for stolen votes in the upcoming election. His answer: Michigan has a paper ballot/optical scan system, which is considered best practice. Touchscreen, paperless systems like those in Ohio, Virginia, and some other states are not secure enough yet. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Jia Deng Selected as Recipient of PAMI Mark Everingham Prize

Prof. Jia Deng has won the PAMI Everingham Prize for his work in developing ImageNet, a large-scale labeled image database that has powered many recent advances in computer vision. The award is presented at the ECCV Conference to a researcher, or a team of researchers, who have made a selfless contribution of significant benefit to other members of the computer vision community. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Deng, Jia  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Matthew Bernhard on the Steve Gruber Show (audio)

Matthew Bernhard, a CSE graduate student working with Prof. J. Alex Halderman, speaks on the Steve Gruber Show about the possibility for voting fraud in Michigan during the upcoming election. He is introduced just over one minute into the show. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

How to (Really) Steal an Election (audio)

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is interviewed on the dangers posed by electronic voting in this story. The story covers all types of concerns regarding elections, from Donald Trump's warning of a rigged election through the Bush v. Gore contest and the use of electronic voting systems. Halderman appears at about 20:15. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Michael Wellman Selected to Serve on Financial Research Advisory Committee

Prof. Michael P. Wellman as been selected to serve on the Financial Research Advisory Committee (FRAC) for the US Department of Treasury's Office of Financial Research. As the only academic computer scientist on the FRAC, Professor Wellman brings expertise on algorithmic trading and other computational techniques that are transforming financial markets and the financial system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Economic Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

U-M to build $75-million robotics hub

Robotic technologies for air, sea, and roads, and for factories, hospitals, and homes will have tailored lab space in the University of Michigan's planned Robotics Laboratory. Prof. Jessy Grizzle has been named director of robotics at U-M, and is leading the new facility's planning and development. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Teslas big bet: $8,000 worth of self-driving hardware in all new cars before the software is ready

In this article, Prof. Edwin Olson is quoted discussing the reliability of autonomous vehicles. Tesla recently announced that all new cars will be equipped with the hardware needed for full self-driving capability. Olson believes theres still a long way to go until self-driving cars become widespread. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

This Is Why We Still Cant Vote Online

This article highlights the work done by security researchers to demonstrate the dangers inherent in the use of paperless electronic voting systems. It spotlights work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his students in 2010, when they accepted a challenge to hack Washington DC's proposed new Internet system. The research team was able to hack the system, steal records, and modify it to play the Michigan fight song -- all in less than two days. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Rigging the Election

Jason Smith, writer and director of the documentary "I Voted?", references work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman in demonstrating the vulnerabilities of electronic voting systems in this opinion piece. Mr. Smith's mission has been to reinforce the message that "Nothing is more important to the future of our democracy than ensuring the integrity of all elections." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Having Fun with ECE

Students, alumni, faculty, and friends came together for games and exciting displays at this year's Family Fun Night. Attendees of all ages brought the EECS atrium to life in an evening of science, robots, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

A temporary tattoo that brings hospital care to the home

What if doctors could monitor patients at home with the same degree of accuracy they'd get during a stay at the hospital? Bioelectronics innovator and alum Todd Coleman (BSE EE ) shares his quest to develop wearable, flexible electronic health monitoring patches that promise to revolutionize healthcare and make medicine less invasive. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Health  

Lingjia Tang Selected to Receive Facebook Faculty Award

Prof. Lingjia Tang has been selected to receive a Facebook Faculty Award for her work in computer architecture. She recently helped develop a modular load tester platform for data centers, which is designed to help measure and mitigate tail latency. The platform, called Treadmill, is widely used in Facebooks production services. It is also open-sourced and available to the general public and industry practitioners. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Tang, Lingjia  

Experts: State Should Audit Election Results

Since hackers have targeted the election systems of more than 20 states, cyber-security experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman say Michigan should change its policy and routinely audit a sample of its paper ballots to protect against election fraud. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

As cyberthreats multiply, hackers now target medical devices

This article, which quotes Prof. Kevin Fu, describes the threat of malware for implantable medical devices and for hospital systems. Because these systems were typically designed without security in mind, "There is no [impervious] device," says Prof. Fu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Parag Deotare Receives AFOSR Award for Research in Nanoscale Exciton-Mechanical Systems (NEXMS)

Prof. Parag Deotare received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to support basic scientific research in Nanoscale Exciton-Mechanical Systems (NEXMS). In this project, Prof. Deotare will investigate the interactions between exciton and mechanics, which will lead to a better understanding of exciton dynamics. This work will deepen our understanding of the underlying physics of exciton-mechanics interactions and help engineer novel devices for energy harvesting and up-conversion. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Scavenging  Energy Science and Engineering  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  

Clinc Launches Finie, an AI Personal Assistant for Mobile Banking

Clinc, the research lab founded by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, has recently launched a new application called Finie, the financial genie. Finie, which can be referred to as the Siri of personal banking, is an artificial intelligence platform for banks that helps customers talk to their bank accounts in a natural and conversational way to get real-time and instant financial insights. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

What Surveillance Will Look Like in the Future: Even Bugs Will Be Bugged

Prof. David Blaauw gets a mention in the Atlantic for building the world's smallest computers, which can be equipped with cameras and other sensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  

Looking for a Choice of Voices in A.I. Technology

This article in the New York Times examines conversational computing in connection with gender and race. Prof. Jason Mars is featured in the article and he highlights the challenges associated with choosing voices for AI technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  

Asked and Answered Jessy Grizzle Takes on Reddit

Prof. Jessy Grizzle, newly named Director of Michigan Robotics, took to Reddit to answer the internet's burning questions about bipedal robots. The first in the department to tackle the medium, he spent a day fielding open questions from the public as part of an Ask Me Anything on the science subreddit. Questions ranged from deep algorithm inquiries to complaints about tough EECS courses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

A Silver-Medal Finish for ECE Olympic Rower

Electrical Engineering sophomore and Ann Arbor native Zach Burns brought home a silver medal from the Rio De Janeiro Summer Olympics in September as part of the US Paralympic Rowing Team. This was Zachs third year with the team, finally getting to take on the Olympic games after two years traveling to the World Championships. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Profile  Undergraduate Students  

Cybersecurity and Voting Machine Security (video)

Prof. J. Alex Halderman appeared on C-SPAN to discuss vulnerabilities associated with electronic voting and to answer viewer questions. It's worth viewing this 40-minute video segment of the C-SPAN airing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Technology Will Destroy Democracy Unless This Man Stops It

This article provides an in-depth profile of Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his research in the area of security, in particular his work in exposing the security vulnerabilities of electronic voting systems and his additional work in the area of internet anticensorship. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Why Can't We Vote Online?

This article on the security concerns associated with Internet voting points to the 2010 hack of the District of Columbia's internet voting system by researchers led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman as a prime example of what could go wrong. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Solving the "Christmas light" problem so solar panels can handle shade

Just 10 percent shade cover can create a 50 percent drop in solar panel electricity production. Prof. Al-Thaddeus Avestrus is working to ensure power produced by a solar panel reflects the average over all the cells. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  Sustainability  

COVE: A Tool for Advancing Progress in Computer Vision

A new project has been launched to provide open and easy access to up-to-date, varied, data sets, annotations and their relevant tools. Based at the University of Michigan with collaborators at Boston University and the University of Notre Dame, the program aims to centralize available data in the intelligent systems community through a COmputer Vision Exchange for Data, Annotations and Tools, called COVE. The project promises to have an immediate and far-reaching impact on the computer vision community as well as researchers involved in machine learning, multimedia, natural language processing, data mining, and information retrieval. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

U-M Shannon Centennial Symposium Celebrates the Father of Information Theory

Researchers from around the nation gathered at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor to celebrate the 100th birthday of alumnus Claude E. Shannon (BSE EE/Eng Math , ScD hon. ) at the Shannon Centennial Symposium on September 16, 2016, co-organized by Al Hero, Hye Won Chung, Dave Neuhoff, and Sandeep Pradhan. All four plenary talks are available online. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Systems  Neuhoff, David L.  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  

Flint might have a bigger problem with lead pipes than previously thought

Prof. Jacob Abernethy and his research collaborators have concluded that Flint city records are highly inaccurate and that more public service water lines than expected that contain lead. Prof. Abernethy, together with his students and other researchers, is using multiple data sources to develop predictive software that will identify locations in Flint that are most at risk for lead contamination. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Far more Flint homes have lead lines than expected, report shows

A new report issued by U-M researchers, including Prof. Jacob Abernethy, concludes that Flint city records are highly inaccurate and that more public service water lines than expected contain lead. Prof. Abernethy, together with his students and other researchers, is using multiple data sources to develop predictive software that will identify locations in Flint that are most at risk for lead contamination. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Shadows in the Dark Web

Secrets lurk in the dark web, the 95 percent of the internet that most of us can't see. Prof. Michael Cafarella is bringing some of those secrets to light, and in the process making the digital and the real world a little safer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Six New Faculty Join CSE

CSE is delighted to welcome six outstanding new faculty members to Michigan. From contributions in distributed systems to building reliable and secure software, they'll help to lead and teach us as we enter a world increasingly shaped by computer science and engineering. [Full Story]

Sang Won Lee Receives Award for Best Student Composition at the International Computer Music Conference

CSE PhD candidate Sang Won Lee has received the 2016 Student Music Award for best student composition at the International Computer Music Conference in Utrecht, the Netherlands for his composition "Live Writing: Gloomy Streets." This performance is an outcome coming from his interdisciplinary research work, Live Writing, which transforms asynchronous written communication into a real-time experience in the context of programming, writing and performing arts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new device for studying tumor cells can trap 10,000 individual cells in a single chip. The technique, developed by Prof. Euisik Yoon's group, could one day help screen potential cancer treatments based on an individual patients tumor and help researchers better understand so-called cancer stem cells. It also shed light on a controversy: are large cells or small cells more likely to be cancer stem cells? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

David Blaauw Honored with SIA/SRC University Research Award

Prof. David Blaauw was presented with the University Research Award by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA), in consultation with Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), in recognition of his outstanding contributions to semiconductor research in the area of design research. He was presented with the award by the SIA Board on September 21, 2016 in San Jose, CA. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Medical Devices Should Withstand Rigor, Expert Says

When it comes to managing medical device security risk, hospital administrators should focus on weathering the storm and not necessarily prevention, Prof. Kevin Fu, a noted medical device security expert, encouraged this week. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

A Brief Chronology of Medical Device Security

This article in the Communications of the ACM, co-written by Prof. Peter Honeyman, reviews the current era of cyber threat to medical device security. The article concludes with a look forward at steps necessary to secure medical devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Honeyman, Peter  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

Cindy Finelli Invited to NAE Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium

Cindy Finelli was among 48 faculty members across the country invited to attend the 2016 National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium. She will present her project about A more student-centered electrical engineering classroom through pre-class reading and in-class problem solving, which integrates elements of a flipped classroom. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Progress in AI, through collaborative research

Guru Banavar, Chief Science Officer and VP for Cognitive Computing at IBM Research, has blogged about IBM's university partnerships to advance cognitive computing, including work at CSE led by Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja to develop the next generation of conversational interface technologies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Cognitive Science & Architectures  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Despite Flaws, Paperless Voting Machines Remain Widespread in the U.S.

This article surveys problems associated with aging and insecure electronic voting systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, a leading researcher in this area, as saying, "Clearly we still have a long way to go to ensure that all Americans have access to a form of voting technology they can trust." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Meet the New Director of Michigan Robotics

Jessy Grizzle, the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor and Jerry W. and Carol L. Levin Professor of Engineering, has been written about in Wired, his work featured on CNN and The Discovery Channel, and his robot videos viewed around the world even in Michigan Stadium during the football games. He's now the new director of Michigan Robotics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

A New Era of Robotics at Michigan

A newly approved robotics center promises to consolidate and expand existing robotics research at U-M. With Jessy Grizzle as Director, everyone is excited at the promise the new space offers for increased collaboration and synergy of effort. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

D'Souzas Make Gift to Support Undergraduate Students in CSE

Robin (BSE CS 06) and Priancka D'Souza of New York, New York have recently established the Robin and Priancka D'Souza Family Scholarship to provide need-based support to undergraduate students pursuing a degree in Computer Science and Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway to Receive Honorary Degree from University of Victoria

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway will receive an honorary degree from the University of Victoria - the university's highest academic honor - during fall the convocation ceremony on Nov. 9 in the University Centre Farquhar Auditorium. Prof. Conway will be recognized for her pioneering work in VLSI and as a leading activist for transgender rights. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

Chad Jenkins Receives NSF National Robotics Initiative Grant to Improve Robotic Control in Cluttered Environments

Prof. Chad Jenkins has been awarded an NSF National Robotics Initiative grant of $400,000 for his project, Sketching Geometry and Physics Informed Inference for Mobile Robot Manipulation in Cluttered Scenes." Under the grant, Prof. Jenkins will improve the ability of robots to manipulate and interact with objects, such as when assisting people to support their daily activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jenkins, Chad  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

A hot new app is hoping to change the way you manage your money

This article reports on Clinc, the intelligent personal assistant startup headed by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang. At the Finovate conference, Clinc introduced Finie, the planet's most intelligent personal financial assistant that helps everyone talk to their bank accounts in a natural and conversational way to get real-time and instant financial insights. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Technology Transfer  

CS KickStart Gives Incoming Freshmen an Introduction to Computer Science

CSE was a sponsor of the first-ever CS KickStart, which is a week long summer program that encourages women without prior programming experience to consider studying computer science. This program is free for attendees and gives 20-25 students the opportunity to learn how to code, connect with other students and faculty, and explore potential careers in computer science. The program was founded by CSE PhD student Meghan Clark. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

EECS Students Row Blue! to Victory

The Michigan Mens Rowing team won their 9th consecutive national championship in Gainesville, Georgia, with four EECS students rowing in their toughest category. Their succesful season qualified the team to compete abroad in the Henley Royal Regatta, the most prestigious boat race series in the world, which takes place annually on the River Thames in England. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Mark Kushner Receives Plasma Chemistry Award for Lifetime of Achievement

Mark Kushner, George I. Haddad Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has been awarded the 2017 Plasma Chemistry Award (PCA) from the International Plasma Chemistry Society (IPCS). The Plasma Chemistry Award is the highest recognition awarded by the IPCS and recognizes a lifetime of achievements in the field of the Plasma Chemistry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

ECE Welcomes New Faculty

ECE is delighted to welcome these outstanding new faculty members to Michigan. These faculty broaden and deepen ECE's areas of expertise in robotics, ultra low power circuits, nanophotonics, information theory, and many other areas. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Afshari, Ehsan  Berenson, Dmitry  Kim, Hun-Seok  Kira, Mackillo  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lab-Systems  Mahdavifar, Hessam  Mi, Zetian  Pilanci, Mert  

U-M, Yottabyte partner to accelerate data-intensive research

A strategic partnership between the University of Michigan and software company Yottabyte promises to unleash a new wave of data-intensive research by providing a flexible computing cloud for complex computational analyses of sensitive and restricted data. Prof. Eric Michielssen says it will “improve research productivity by reducing the cost and time required to create the individualized, secure computing platforms that are increasingly necessary to support scientific discovery in the age of Big Data.” [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Michielssen, Eric  

How big data and algorithms are slashing the cost of fixing Flints water crisis

Michigan researchers, including the Michigan Data Science student team, are using new algorithmic and statistical tools to help inform crisis response in Flint. Profs. Jacob Abernethy and Eric Schwartz of the Business School explain how in this article at the Conversation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Student Teams and Organizations  

Paperless voting could fuel 'rigged' election claims

This article describes the concern that talk of a potentially "rigged" election could undermine confidence in results. Amongst the issues associated with electronic voting is that many systems do not produce paper backups that could be used for verification, according to Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

An experimental policing tool is gaining traction across the country and there are major civil-liberties concerns

This article on the use of data for predictive policing points to the possibility that those practices could lead to racial profiling and aggressive policing. It quotes HV Jagadish, Bernard A. Galler Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, on the subject. He suggests that police departments haven't struck the right balance between more efficiently targeting crime and avoiding civil-liberties conflicts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Expert Questions Claim That St. Jude Pacemaker Was Hacked

This article reports on the work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators, which has called into question the allegations of security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices. The claim of security holes was made by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  

Hacking Healthcare - How Big Data is Driving Big Changes in Medicine

The article by CoE writer Gabe Cherry highlights the work being done by Jenna Wiens and her collaborators on using big data to predict which hospital patients are at risk of developing a life-threatening intestinal infection called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. It also provides context on the big data initiatives taking at UM in general and with respect to healthcare, and across EECS, including work by Prof. Barzan Mozafari on how to improve the design of big data databases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Michielssen, Eric  Mower Provost, Emily  Mozafari, Barzan  Wiens, Jenna  

Guarding Presidential Election Vote Integrity Presents a Daunting Task

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted in this article regarding election integrity. He points out that any election system must be able to prove that results are accurate in order to dispel concerns about vote rigging. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

New Concerns About Hacks Into State Voting Systems

Prof. J. Alex Halderman was a guest on the Diane Rehm show on August 31, where the conversation included discussion of the security of elections. Click the "Listen" button under the headline to hear the interview; the discussion with Prof. Halderman begins at 20:30. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hacking Report on St. Jude Pacemakers Was Flawed, Researchers Say

This article details how a report on cybersecurity vulnerabilities in St. Jude Medicals implantable heart devices released last week by short sellers was flawed and didnt prove the flaws existed, according to a review by University of Michigan researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Jasprit Singh: Seeking a Better Life Through Engineering - Even in Retirement

Prof. Jasprit Singh has retired after 30 years at the University of Michigan to embark on his second career as president and co-founder of Gurmentor, Inc., a software application company. During his time at Michigan, he experienced the thrill of scientific discovery, enlightening students into the physics and mysteries of electrical engineering, and sharing his belief that technology can enhance healthy and peaceful living. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Singh, Jasprit  

University study finds flaws in criticism of St. Jude cyber security

This article reports on the work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators, which has called into question the allegations of security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices. The claim of security holes was released last week by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Correlation is Not Causation: Electrical Analysis of St. Jude Implant Shows Normal Pacing

This blog post by the Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security provides additional technical detail regarding the claims by Muddy Waters and St. Jude regarding pacemaker/defibrillator security. Prof. Kevin Fu, who heads the Archimedes Center, and his collaborators at Michigan have concluded that those claims are questionable. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Holes Found in Report on St. Jude Medical Device Security

Michigan researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu have reproduced experiments alleging security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices and have concluded that those claims are questionable. The report alleging the security flaws was released last week by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

How Electronic Voting Could Undermine the Election

Foreign hackers, domestic hackers, those with physical access to voting machines, and those who attack from afar: this article describes the multiple risks associated with electronic voting and highlights the work of Prof. J. Alex Halderman in making this clear to us. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Real holograms are on bank cards, not starships

Holograms are more than science fiction, but the real-life technology isnt what people think it is. Most of the technologies calling themselves holographic do not produce actual holograms including the specters of Vargas Llosa, Kimmel, Modi, Tupac, and MJ, which are created via computer-generated images and high-definition video projection. A real hologram is an image that records the diffraction of laser light directed at an object, and was invented in part by EECS professor Emmett Leith in the 1960s. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Holography  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  

Necmiye Ozay Receives NASA Early Career Faculty Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a NASA Early Career Faculty award for her project, "Run-time anomaly detection and mitigation in information-rich cyber-physical systems." Her research will be designed to assist in future missions in space, while being applicable to a wide range of cyber-physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Space technology  

Celebrating a Leader in Control Systems

Friends and former students of Prof. Demos Teneketzis celebrated his 65th birthday with a Workshop on Information, Decisions, and Networks in his honor. Throughout the two-day event, this group of accomplished researchers presented on their work spanning the different fields of control theory. Speakers, students and friends came from around the world and represented all corners of industry and academia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Control Systems  Lab-Systems  Lafortune, Stephane  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  

Meet DDoSCoin, the Cryptocurrency that Pays When You P0wn

This article in the Register reports on the research conducted by CSE alum Eric Wustrow and CSE student Benjamin VanderSloot. They created a proof-of-work project built on cryptocurrency that offers a means to prove participation in distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. DDoSCoin allows miners to prove that they have contributed to a distributed denial of service attack against specific target servers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  

New Cryptocurrency DDoSCoin Incentivizes Users for Participating in DDoS Attacks

The article reports on the new research paper by CSE alum Eric Wustrow and CSE student Benjamin VanderSloot. The researchers have put forward the concept of DDoSCoin a cryptocurrency with a malicious proof-of-work. Presented at the Usenix 2016 security conference, the researchers explain the DDoSCoin system which enables miners to select the victim servers by consensus using a proof-of-stake protocol. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  

Toyota Research Institute Partners with U-M on Artificial Intelligence

Research focused on artificial intelligence, robotics and autonomous driving at the University of Michigan will get a major boost thanks to an initial $22 million commitment from the Toyota Research Institute, TRI CEO Gill Pratt announced recently in an address to U-M faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Online voting could be really convenient. But its still probably a terrible idea.

This article reports on Internet voting availability in the US. It then examines Estonia's electronic voting system, which has been been hailed by some as a model system for secure electronic voting. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who was part of a security team that documented failings in the Estonian system, disagrees and is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Algorithms Can be More Fair than Humans

In this article in The Conversation, Prof. H. V. Jagadish talks about how algorithms can discriminate, even when their designers don't intend that to happen, but they also can make detecting bias easier. He states, While it is tempting to believe data-driven decisions are unbiased, research and scholarly discussion are beginning to demonstrate that unfairness and discrimination remain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  

'The Most Interesting Tech IPO of the Year' was Founded by Alums

Michigan Engineering speaks with the founders of Twilio, CS alumni Jeff Lawson, Evan Cooke, and John Wolthuis. The startup, a $1 billion cloud communications company, went public in late June, bringing in $150 million. Quartz called the move the most interesting tech IPO of the year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Peter Honeyman Receives USENIX Test of Time Award

Prof. Peter Honeyman and CSE alumnus Niels Provos have received the USENIX Test of Time Award for their paper on privilege separation, a generic approach that lets parts of an application run with different levels of privilege. They share this award with co-author Markus Friedl. The USENIX Test of Time Awards recognizes papers presented at its respective conference from at least 10 years ago that have had a lasting impact on their fields. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Honeyman, Peter  Lab-Software Systems  

Several Michigan Papers Presented at 2016 USENIX Security Symposium

Five papers authored by CSE researchers were presented at the 2016 USENIX Security Symposium, which took place August 10-12 in Austin, TX, and two papers were presented at WOOT 2016. USENIX Security brings together researchers from both academia and industry interested in the latest advances in the security of computer systems and networks. The symposium is a premier venue for security and privacy research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Shin, Kang G.  

Prof. Dragomir Radev Honored as ACM Fellow at Annual Awards Banquet

Prof. Dragomir Radev was honored as an ACM Fellow at the annual ACM Awards Banquet, which took place June 11th in San Francisco, CA. The ACM Awards honors those whose contributions have impacted our world for the better in countless ways. ACM has recognized 42 of its members for their significant contributions to the development and application of computing in areas from data management and spoken-language processing to robotics and cryptography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

Students Seek the Secrets of the Brain in Study Abroad Program

Eight undergrad students got the chance to work on cutting edge brain research in Germany this summer through the International Program for the Advancement of Neurotechnology (IPAN). Directed by Prof. Euisik Yoon, the program sent students from around the country to two universities where they experienced a month of in-depth lab work on devices that could help us better understand the brain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Undergraduate Students  Yoon, Euisik  

Researchers David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman Receive Pwnie Award for Work on DROWN Attack

A research team that includes CSE PhD student David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been awarded the Pwnie Award for Best Cryptographic Attack at the Black Hat conference for their work on the DROWN attack. DROWN allows attackers to break encryption used to protect HTTPS websites and read or steal sensitive communications, including passwords, credit card numbers, trade secrets, or financial data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Solar power plant: $1.4M grant aims to cut costs

Nanotechnology could reduce the cost of the most expensive part of a solar thermal power plant by roughly 75 percent. The Department of Energy gave a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, the University of Michigan and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory $1.4 million to develop new solar concentrators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  

Screen Savers: The World's Smallest Computer

The new episode of Screen Savers features Prof. David Blaauw, whose team has developed the world's smallest computer. The Michigan Micro Mote (M3) works as a fully functioning computer on the millimeter scale. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

CSE-Based Startup Receives Funding to Develop Systems Based on Intelligent Personal Assistant Technology

Artificial Intelligence startup Clinc, founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang along with Research Fellow Michael Laurenzano and CSE graduate student Johann Hauswald, is off and running in downtown Ann Arbor. On August 4, 2016, the company announced a $225,000 National Science Foundation Grant and closure of a $1.2 million round of seed funding. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Michigan Solar Car defends national title in sweeping victory

Despite nearly-sunless conditions in the final two days, the University of Michigan Solar Car team has successfully defended their decade-long reigning championship winning the 2016 American Solar Challenge for the sixth consecutive time. After two sunless final days of the race, U-M's car, Aurum, ended up the only entree to finish on 100% solar power. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Solar Cell Technology  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Hackers Fool Tesla Autopilot Into Making Obstacles 'Disappear' -- But Don't Panic About Crashes Yet

Wenyuan Xu, a visiting professor at CSE from the University of South Carolina, is part of a research team that has developed techniques for sabotaging the sensors for the autopilot in a Tesla. This article in Forbes describes how the research team used three forms of attack to tick the Tesla. [Full Story]

Hackers Fool Tesla S's Autopilot to Hide and Spoof Obstacles

Wenyuan Xu, a visiting professor at CSE from the University of South Carolina, is part of a research team that has developed techniques for sabotaging the sensors for the autopilot in a Tesla. This article in Wired describes how they simulated an attack from an adjacent car equipped with sensor jamming equipment. [Full Story]

Researchers Seek to Help the Disabled with Intelligent Robotic Wheelchair

Prof. Ben Kuipers, CSE graduate student Collin Johnson, and researcher Dr. Jong Jin Park have created Vulcan, an intelligent robotic wheelchair. Vulcan learns the spatial structure of the environment it moves through and it uses that knowledge to plan and follow routes from place to place. Robotic wheelchairs will benefit people who need a wheelchair, but are unable to use one because of multiple disabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

CSE Researchers Win Pwnie Award for Work on DROWN Attack

A research team that includes CSE PhD student David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been awarded the Pwnie Award for Best Cryptographic Attack at the BlackHat conference for their work on the DROWN attack. DROWN is a serious vulnerability that affects HTTPS and other services that rely on SSL and TLS, some of the essential cryptographic protocols for Internet security. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

How to Hack an Election in 7 Minutes

This in-depth article in Politico traces the history of "the Princeton group" -- a cadre of security experts, including Michigan's Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who grew out of Andrew Appel and Ed Felton's groups at Princeton and have influenced the conversation on the security of electronic voting. The article concludes with this remark from Halderman regarding the danger posed by state-sponsored cyber attackers: "We sit around all day and write research papers. But these people are full time exploiters. They're the professionals. We're the amateurs." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hands-On Robotics: A Course for Anyone Interested in Robots and Autonomy

Check out this new video about the course Hands on Robotics. It not only provides an introduction to the broadly interdisciplinary field of robotics, it encourages students to solve an open-ended problem. Students build different types of robots throughout the semester using the CKBot modular robot system. The course covers concepts from kinematics, to control, to programming. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Course  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

With Over 7 Million Certificates Issued, Let's Encrypt Aims to Secure the Entire Web

Let's Encrypt, the non-profit certificate authority founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman with colleagues at Mozilla and Electronic Frontier Foundation, is well on its way to securing the web. By making the switch to HTTPS free and easy, Let's Encrypt has issued over 7 million certificates since December 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  

The Adventures of a Blissfully Unaware Bipedal Robot at the Grassy Wave Field

Evan Ackerman writes: "Grizzle says that when it comes to MARLO trying to conquer the 'devious undulations' of the Wave Field, 'we have gotten farther than I thought we would, to be honest.' This is the sort of thing we like to hear from researchers and dont, usually: pleasant surprise about how well their robot is performing. For more details on how MARLO managed to get this far, we asked him a few specific questions." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Dragomir Radev Coaches US Linguists in Competition at 2016 International Linguistics Olympiad

Dragomir Radev, Professor in Computer Science and Engineering, the School of Information, and in the Department of Linguistics, has coached US high school students to successful competition at the 14th International Linguistics Olympiad (IOL), which was held at the Infosys campus in Mysore, India from from July 25 to July 29, 2016. It is the tenth year that Radev has coached the team. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

Tiny Computer Has Enormous Potential

"The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif., has a new addition - one that is at the cutting edge of new computer technology. It isnt a breakthrough new powerhouse in computing, but instead a computer so small that one of the devices can sit on the edge of a coin." It's the Michigan Micro Mote! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  

Summer Bootcamp Prepares Undergraduates for Work with Big Data

The Big Data Summer Bootcamp, a six-week interdisciplinary training and research program co-designed by Prof. Barzan Mozafari and his collaborators from other departments, has given students from around the country a comprehensive overview of the field of big data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

New Venture is on the Path to Build Continual Learning AIs

Cogitai, Inc., a continual learning company co-founded by Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja, is developing AI technology that empowers machines to learn from interaction with the real world, enabling everyday things that sense and act to get smarter, more skilled, and more knowledgeable with experience. The company has recently announced funding by Sony. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

UM::Autonomy Makes a Strong Finish at RobotBoat Competition

The UM::Autonomy team took 6th place in the world at this years RoboNation RoboBoat Competition, where teams build autonomous, robotic boats to navigate and race through an aquatic obstacle course. The boat is completely designed and programmed by the students each year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Pioneering Engineering Education Research

A new initiative at the College of Engineering has brought U-M into the spotlight in the field of Engineering Education Research (EER). Spearheaded by Prof. David C. Munson, Jr. while he was Dean, the College took a unique approach to EER by embedding faculty directly into traditional engineering departments. A few other institutions had already developed standalone departments or schools for EER with their own sets of faculty and PhD students, but U-Ms approach is the first of its kind. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Baja Wins Big

The U-M Baja Racing Team made huge waves this season. Along with their second consecutive overall 1st place finish, they also received the seasons highest honor, the Mike Schmidt Memorial Award. This award is given to the team with the highest cumulative points between three competitions. As if that wasnt enough, at the California race the team broke the record for the most points ever earned at a Baja SAE event, scoring 1007/1000. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Students from the United States visiting various work groups of BrainLinks-BrainTools this summer

Four undergrad students participating in the International Program for the Advancement of Neurotechnology (IPAN)'s summer bootcamp visited the cluster of excellence at Freiburg University in Germany. The students received training in modern neuroscience research and tools. IPAN and the study abroad program are directed by Prof. Euisik Yoon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Undergraduate Students  Yoon, Euisik  

The DNC Leak Shows How Vulnerable This Election Is To Hacking

Security experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman are quoted in this article about the security risks associated with electronic voting. Many studies conducted by Prof. Halderman and his contemporaries have demonstrated that elections based on electronic voting are at risk of manipulation - often without detection. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Reinforcement Renaissance

This article in Communications of the ACM reviews reinforcement learning and how it is complemented by deep learning in systems that aim to learn the way that humans do. Prof Satinder Singh Baveja is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

ECE Alumnus Leverages Big Data to Influence Corporate Strategy

Rodger Howell (BSE EE 1990) says data analytics and machine learning can be key to boosting revenues and streamlining financial reporting in this guest column. While many CFOs recognize the value of big data and its insights, some are overwhelmed by the volume of information available and have yet to fully leverage it. Rodger helps companies align costs to their business strategy as an Advisory principal for PwCs Strategy, [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Big Data  

National Robotics Initiative: Celebrating Five Years, Looking Ahead

Move over, C-3PO and R2-D2! You may have been robot celebrities during the glory years of Star Wars, but next-generation robotics are the new, 21st century superstars. A recent event on Capitol Hill celebrated the five-year anniversary of the National Robotics Initiative. It also provided an opportunity for NRI-funded research groups to both display their accomplishments, and also encourage Congress to maintain this critical funding mechanism for robotics in the United States. Prof. Jessy Grizzle attended with a display on his work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

EECS Research Highlighted at 2016 Robotics: Science and Systems Conference

The University of Michigan was host to the 2016 Robotics: Science and Systems Conference, which took place June 18-22. The conference, which was co-chaired by Prof. Edwin Olson and Prof. Ryan Eustice, brought together researchers working on algorithmic or mathematical foundations of robotics, robotics applications, and analysis of robotic systems. The event gave attendees the opportunity to see the best research in all areas of robotics, as well as, attend invited talks, oral and interactive presentations of refereed papers, workshops, tutorials, and lab presentations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Jenkins, Chad  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Systems  Olson, Edwin  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

Data Equality on the Internet Might Bring Unintended Consequences

Prof. Harsha Madhyastha was interviewed on Michigan Radio about the possibilities for unintended consequences of net neutrality, and the difficulty of finding an acceptable alternative. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

New Undergraduate Program in Data Science Grows Rapidly, Graduates First Student

In Fall 2015, the EECS Department and the Department of Statistics in LSA launched a joint undergraduate program in Data Science. As of Spring of 2016, the program had grown to 79 declared majors, 36 in engineering and 43 in LSA. The first engineering student to graduate with a degree in data science was Ryan Schrader, a dual data science/computer science major who matriculated in December 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Big Data  Undergraduate Students  

R&D's Scientist of the Year - Starting 50 Years Ago with the Pioneer

50 years ago R&D Magazine chose its very first recipient of the prestigious Scientist of the Year Award Emmett Leith. The professor of electrical engineering at the University of Michigan was presented with the honor for co-inventing the three-dimensional holography, better known as the technology of laser to help create 3D photography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Holography  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

ECE Alumnus Franklin Dollar 2016 Sloan Research Fellow and Most Promising Scientist

Franklin Dollar (MSE EE 2010, PhD Applied Physics 2012), Assistant Professor of Physics & Astronomy at UC-Irvine, was named a Sloan Research Fellow and Most Promising Scientist in 2016 by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Prof. Dollar directs the Dollar Lab of Ultrafast High Intensity Plasma Physics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Prof. Dragomir Radev Teaching Course on NLP Through Coursera

This summer, Prof. Dragomir Radev is teaching two offerings of his course,"Introduction to Natural Language Processing" through Coursera, the online education platform which aims to provide universal access to the worlds best education. The first course offering began July 4th and the second is set to begin on August 1st. Both sessions are 12 weeks long. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Radev, Dragomir  

CSE Alumna Adriane Chapman Recognized with Test of Time Award from ACM SIGMOD

Alumnae Adriane Chapman (CSE MS PhD 06 08) has been recognized with the prestigious ACM SIGMOD Test of Time Award for her influential paper on techniques for recording provenance for data that is copied among databases. Now a research scientist at MITRE, Dr. Chapman published the paper while a PhD student at Michigan. She shares the award with co-authors Drs. Peter Buneman and James Cheney, both of the University of Edinburgh, UK. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Databases and Data Mining  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Women in Computing  

The Mr. Robot Hack Report: Ransomware and Owning the Smart Home

This article references work done by UM CSE researchers, led by Prof. Atul Prakash, who recently exposed vulnerabilities in the Samsung SmartThings platform that let them set off smoke alarms or even unlock doors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  

Clever Tool Shields Your Car From Hacks by Watching its Internal Clocks

In a paper they plan to present at the Usenix security conference next month, researchers led by Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, describe an easy-to-assemble tool they call the Clock-based Intrusion Detection System, or CIDS. CIDS characterizes the clock inaccuracies of all of the processors in a car in order to spot the malicious messages that hackers use to take control of vehicle components like brakes and transmission. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Shin, Kang G.  

MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

Since he received a robot capable of walking outside, Jessy Grizzle has heard the siren call of the Wave Field, the undulating earthen art installation outside the Franois-Xavier Bagnoud building. MARLO finally got her shot at it. For now, Jessy and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that Grizzle calls merely very difficult. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Stephane Lafortune Named Fellow of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC)

Stephane Lafortune has been named Fellow of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC), "For contributions to control and diagnosis of discrete event systems." Prof. Lafortune has been a leading researcher in the field of discrete event systems (DES) for the last 25 years. His fundamental work covers the gamut from modeling, analysis, diagnosis, control, and optimization. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Lab-Software Systems  Lafortune, Stephane  

Danai Koutra Receives 2016 SIGKDD Doctoral Dissertation Award

Prof. Danai Koutra has been awarded the 2016 SIGKDD Doctoral Dissertation Award for her dissertation, "Exploring and Making Sense of Large Graphs," which she completed while a student at Carnegie Mellon University. The annual SIGKDD doctoral dissertation award recognizes excellent research by doctoral candidates in the field of data mining and knowledge discovery. Each year, SIGKDD receives over 15 nominations and only one winner is chosen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Software Systems  

Experimenting with Post-Quantum Cryptography

This Google blog post announces the company's decision to test post-quantum cryptography in Chrome, in which a small fraction of connections between desktop Chrome and Google's servers will use a post-quantum key-exchange algorithm in addition to the elliptic-curve key-exchange algorithm that would typically be used. The algorithm used in the test builds on work by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  Quantum Computing  Security (Computing)  

Online voting would be disastrous because hackers could hijack the democratic process

This article frames the very real dangers of online voting and underscores them with examples from Prof. J. Alex Halderman's work in demonstrating weaknesses in the Estonian online voting system and Washington DC's 2010 attempt at an Internet voting system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

ECE alumnus is making unmanned flight safe

Raja Sengupta (MSE PhD EE:S 91, 95), a professor of civil and environmental engineering at UC Berkeley and co-founder of the startup company Responsible Robotics, heads a team spun out of the Cal Unmanned Aviation Lab that is creating new technologies that enable drone operators to easily comply with emerging regulations. To foster the safe development of a new industry, drone manufacturers, enthusiasts and regulators are trying to strike the right balance between access and accountability. Responsible Robotics has launched several products to meet that need. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Autonomous Vehicles   

A Women's History of Silicon Valley

Too often, in Silicon Valley as in other places, women are involved in significant events, but their stories go untold. They are the cofounders who are not named in press articles. Check out this list of seven women who were key figures in the technologies that made Silicon Valley what it is today. Included on the list is Professor Emeritus Lynn Conway, who helped make large-scale chip production and innovation possible with her pivotal work on VLSI. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Women in Computing  

Google snaps up startup in push to master computer vision

The future of computer vision looks bright following a string of tech acquisitions in the field, most recently by Google. Jason Corso offers his perspective on the future of computer vision and the challenges researchers have yet to overcome. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Dean Munson honored with ASEE Benjamin Garver Lamme Award

In his last week as the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering, David Munson was honored with the Benjamin Garver Lamme Award from the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). This award is bestowed upon a distinguished engineering educator for contributions to the art of teaching, contributions to research and technical literature, and achievements that contribute to the advancement of the profession of engineering college administration. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Munson Jr., David C.  

A Bipedal Robot Gets Its Swagger On

Popular Science watches MARLO take a stroll across the wave field for the first time. "She's trained her whole life for this moment: MARLO recently stomped and stumbled her way through a new milestone at University of Michigan's Wave Field. The field an art installation turned robot testing ground offers new challenges for the bipedal robot's lateral and forward balance, because of its uneven terrain." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

MARLO the bipedal robot seems to be tipsy

MARLO has captured worldwide attention again with her exploration of the wave field on North Campus. As she tries to navigate the steep bumps with no sensors, just extraordinarily clever algorithms that have her adapting to what she "steps in," she appears to be, well, a bit drunk. This drunken behavior is just MARLO pushing the extremes of what a human-sized bipedal robot can do. See her on Gizmodo, Aol.On and MSN Video
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Tesla crash raises concerns about autonomous vehicle regulation

The fatal crash of a Tesla Motors Inc Model S in Autopilot mode has turned up pressure on auto industry executives and regulators to ensure that automated driving technology is deployed safely. Jason Corso says the product is meant to be a beta test, and that the crash is a wake-up call to a need for significant further study. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Why experts worry about the Tesla crash

Jason Corso told the Detroit Free Press that Tesla's recent autopilot crash is "not a major setback, but an indication of the work still to do." The crash, which resulted in one fatality, occured when neither the automated system nor the driver recognized the white side of the semi-truck against a brightly lit sky. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Can Slower Financial Traders Find a Haven in a World of High-Speed Algorithms?

In this article at The Conversation, Prof. Michael Wellman reviews the latency arms race at the center of high-speed algorithmic trading, in which the first trader to react is able to make money off of slower rivals. He describes the possibility for a frequent call market, in which speed no longer categorically prevails, and how it could be implemented. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wenisch, Thomas  

Tracking and Mitigating Tail Latency in Data Centers

Computer science researchers have developed a modular load tester platform for data centers which is designed to help measure and mitigate tail latency. Called Treadmill, it is described in their paper, "Treadmill: Attributing the Source of Tail Latency through Precise Load Testing and Statistical Inference." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Two Michigan Papers Win Top Awards at IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium

Two papers authored by EECS researchers were selected for top honors at the 37th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. One of the papers, describing and demonstrating a malicious hardware backdoor, received the Distinguished Paper Award. The second, which demonstrated security failings in a commercial smart home platform, received the Distinguished Practical Paper Award. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Hicks, Matt  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Proxy Optimizes Webpage Loading for Better User Experience

Researchers led by Prof. Harsha V. Madhyastha have developed a new web proxy called Klotski, which seeks to improve users' perceptions of how quickly a webpage loads on a mobile device by maximizing the amount of important content on the page that is fetched and displayed within the users attention span. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

A New, Low-Cost Way to Monitor Snow and Ice Thickness to Evaluate Environmental Change

Mohammad Mousavi, PhD student in ECE, earned a Weisnet Medal at the Eastern Snow Conference for his paper Elevation Angular Dependence of Wideband Autocorrelation Radiometric (WiBAR) Remote Sensing of Dry Snowpack and Lake Icepack, co-authored by Dr. Roger De Roo, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi, and Prof. Anthony England. The Weisnet Medal is presented to the best student paper at the conference. Mohammad has developed a new way to remotely measure the thickness of ice and snow with a technology he calls wideband autocorrelation radiometry (WiBAR), offering lower cost, lower power, and more flexibility than competing methods. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  England, Anthony W.  Environment  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Patented Camera Calibration Tool Automates Calibration Target Acquisition

Prof. Edwin Olson and two of his former students, Johannes Strom and Andrew Richardson, have recently been awarded a United States Patent for their work in the development of AprilCal, an interactive camera calibration tool that automates the challenging task of calibration image acquisition. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Collecting Data to Better Identify Bipolar Disorder

Prof. Emily Mower Provost is collaborating with researchers at the University of Michigan Depression Center to develop new technologies that provide individuals and their caregivers with insight into how bipolar disorder changes over time. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mower Provost, Emily  Women in Computing  

CSE Kicks Off Another Summer Of MiBytes Computer Camps

MiBytes, a series of summer computer camps hosted by CSE, has kicked off for summer 2016. This summer CSE has brought back all three camps: Tinkering with Mobile Apps, Game Design & Development, and Hacking in a Digital World. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bond, Jeremy  Darden, Marcus  Diversity and Outreach  Ringenberg, Jeff  

An Award Winning Radar System for Collision Avoidance and Imaging

Armin Jam, doctoral student in ECE, took first place in the student paper competition at the 2016 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation (AP-S) for his paper, "A Horizontally Polarized Beam-Steerable Antenna for Sub-millimeter-wave Polarimetric Imaging and Collision Avoidance Radars," co-authored by his advisor, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi. Armins research is focused on the development of a sub-millimeter-wave (sub-MMW) radar system for the next generation of navigation and imaging sensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

A New Way to Test Low-Frequency Antennas for Long-Range Communication

Jihun Choi, a doctoral student in Prof. Kamal Sarabandi's research group, has earned an honorable mention in the 2016 IEEE Symposium on Antennas and Propagation Student Paper Competition. His paper describes a new technique to test antennas for long-range communication applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mosharaf Chowdhury Receives ACM SIGCOMM Dissertation Award

Prof. Mosharaf Chowdhury has been awarded the 2015 ACM SIGCOMM Doctoral Dissertation award, for his dissertation, Coflow: A Networking Abstraction for Distributed Data-Parallel Applications. Chowdhury's dissertation provides novel and application-aware networking abstractions which significantly improve the performance of networked applications running in the cloud. The dissertation award recognizes excellent thesis research by doctoral candidates in the field of computer networking and data communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Lab-Software Systems  

Rada Mihalcea Leads Research Team to Develop Analytics for Learners as People

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has received funding from the Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) to uncover connections between personal attributes and success or well-being. The multidisciplinary research team includes Profs. Satinder Singh Baveja and Emily Mower Provost from CSE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

CSE Faculty Amongst Researchers in Three of Four Funded MIDAS Projects

The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) has funded four projects for $1.25M each in the first round of its Challenge Initiatives program, which is designed to fund extraordinary projects with major social impact. Prof. Rada Mihalcea is leading one of the projects, which seeks to uncover connections between personal attributes and success or well-being; overall, a number of CSE faculty are amongst the investigators in three of the four projects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Engineering for the Greater Good  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Rick and Mara Wallace Establish ECE Scholarship Fund

Rick (BSE EE 1982) and Mara (BA 1988) Wallace have established the Richard P. and Mara F. Wallace Scholarship Fund. This gift qualifies for the University's Michigan Matching Initiative for Student Support, and proceeds from the fund will provide need-based scholarship support to electrical and computer engineering undergraduate students in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Wurmans Make Gift to Support CSE Graduate Students

CSE alumnus Dr. Peter Wurman and Nancy Wurman have endowed the Wurman Family Computer Science Fellowship Student Fund, which will provide support for graduate students in CSE at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Thorny Technical Questions Remain for Net Neutrality

In this article in The Conversation, Prof. Harsha Madhyastha examines the principle of network neutrality and makes the case for scenarios in which ISPs should be able to treat some differing types of traffic unequally. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Two Papers by Michigan Researchers Chosen as IEEE Micro Top Picks

Two papers authored by EECS researchers have been selected for IEEE Micro's Top Picks from the 2015 Computer Architecture Conferences. The two papers from Michigan introduced the Sirius personal digital assistant and the MBus bus for modular microcomputing systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Dutta, Prabal  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Mudge, Trevor  Tang, Lingjia  

CSE Alumnus Hsin-Hao Su Selected for Principles of Distributed Computing Dissertation Award

CSE alumnus Hsin-Hao Su (PhD CSE 2015) has been selected to receive a Principles of Distributed Computing Dissertation Award for "Algorithms for Fundamental Problems in Computer Networks." Hsin-Hao's thesis provides efficient algorithms for fundamental graph problems that arise in networks, in both sequential and distributed settings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Theory of Computation  Pettie, Seth  

The Most Interesting Tech IPO of the Year

Twilio, founded by CS alumni Jeff Lawson, Evan Cooke, and John Wolthuis in 2007, went public on June 23 with shares closing up nearly 90 percent in the first day of trading. Quartz calls it "the most interesting tech IPO of the year." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  

Leaders in Neuroscience Look to the Future

Engineers and neuroscientists from around the globe gathered at Michigan to explore the future of neurotechnology and research at the International Conference for Advanced Neurotechnology (ICAN). Understanding the complexity and mysteries of the brain is one of the biggest scientific challenges of this century. ICAN is an inaugural conference to bring engineers and neuroscientists together to review the recent advancement in neurotechnology and neuroscience, define the need for next-generation tools to move neuroscience forward, and enhance the translation of technology to the scientific community. The event included guest lectures and panel discussions, as well as a student poster session. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  MEMS and Microsystems  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wise, Kensall  Yoon, Euisik  

Professors Fawwaz Ulaby and Andrew Yagle publish the 2nd edition of the textbook, Engineering Signals and Systems in Continuous and Discrete Time

Fawwaz Ulaby, Emmett Leith Distinguished University Professor and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and Prof. Andrew Yagle authored the 2nd edition of the book, Engineering Signals and Systems in Continuous and Discrete Time, published by National Technology & Science Press. This edition includes two additional chapters, new concepts throughout the book, and additional problem sets. This textbook is designed for a sophomore-level or early junior-level introductory course on signals and systems. Engineering applications of signals and systems are integrated into the presentation as equal partners with concepts and mathematical models. At least seventeen schools in the U.S. are using the first edition textbook in their courses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Lab-Systems  Ulaby, Fawwaz  Yagle, Andrew E.  

Prof. Al Hero Editor of New Book: Big Data over Networks

Alfred O. Hero, III, John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor of EECS and R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, is co-editor of the book, Big Data over Networks, published by Cambridge University Press, along with Prof. Shuguang Cui (Texas A&M), Prof. Zhi-Quan Luo (U. Minnesota), and Prof. Jos Moura (CMU). The book explores the principles underpinning large-scale information processing over networks and examines the crucial interaction between big data and its associated communication, social and biological networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Systems  

James Freudenberg Takes Embedded Control Systems to Zurich

Prof. James Freudenberg taught his course, Embedded Control Systems, as a guest at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. The school prepared a video highlighting the course, which provides a comprehensive overview of embedded control systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Freudenberg, James S.  Lab-Systems  

Video of the week: Injectable radio broadcasts through flesh in real-time

The Engineer highlighted research by Prof. David Wentzloff and David Blaauw on an injectable radio that can broadcast from inside the human body. This latest advance will enable the relay of information in real-time to devices monitoring heart fibrillation as well as glucose monitoring for diabetics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Medical diagnosis  Millimeter-scale Computing  Wentzloff, David  

Arborlight Names Michael McCorquodale as CEO

ECE alum Michael McCorquodale has been named CEO of Arborlight. Co-founded by Prof. P.C. Ku, Arborlight develops lighting systems that most emulate natural daylight. Dr. McCorquodale returns to Michigan from Californias Silicon Valley where he founded and led several successful firms since 2004. In 2012, Electronic Engineering Times named him Innovator of the Year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lighting  

U-M cyber security startup purchased by FICO

QuadMetrics, a cyber risk security startup co-founded by Prof. Mingyan Liu, announced it has been purchased. Analytic software company FICO of San Jose, Calif., bought QuadMetrics to help in its development of a FICO Enterprise Security Score. The scores will rank an organization's level of cyber security risk, the company said in a statement. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  Technology Transfer  

Steve Rand: Expanding Technical Education in India

Prof. Stephen Rand recently visited India to learn about the countrys ongoing expansion in higher education as an Optical Society of America (OSA) Fellow Lecturer. He focused on "how India is enhancing its role as a leader in optical engineering and physics discovery in the 21st century," in an article written for the June issue of Optics and Photonics News.
Read the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Michigan ranks #2 in robotics by 2 different groups!

Yes - that's right!

Top Robotics Graduate Programs
Top 20 Robotics Engineering Schools in the U.S.
Want to learn more about the faculty who are making it happen here in EECS? Click Here
Related Topics:  Robotics  

FICO has acquired QuadMetrics

Announced June 14, 2016, FICO (NYSE: FICO) has acquired QuadMetrics to accelerate development of the product, which will provide greater transparency into cybersecurity for underwriting, vendor management and self-assessment. Co-founded in 2014 by Prof. Mingyan Liu, who served as Chief Science Officer, QuadMetrics was a firm that used predictive analytics to rate the security of an organization. [Read the story: Fighting Cyber Crime with Data Analytics] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Liu, Mingyan  

U-M researchers work to determine when people are lying

This article reports on work being done by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and Prof. Mihai Burzo (UM Flint), who have built unique lie-detecting software based on real-world data. Their prototype considers both a speaker's words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, it doesn't need to touch the subject in order to work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

U-M professors know wonders, risks of self-driving cars

This article in the Free Press examines the work of Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice as they take on their new roles heading up key research areas at Toyota's new Ann Arbor Toyota Research Institute location. Prof. Olson will lead Toyota's the perception thrust and Prof. Eustice will lead the mapping/localization effort. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

The AI Machines Undergoing Behavioral Psychology Tests

As reported in MIT Technology Review, graduate student researchers Junhyuk Oh and Valliappa Chockalingam, along with Profs. Satinder Singh Baveja and Honglak Lee have created mazes in Minecraft to perform reinforcement learning experiments on artificial intelligence entities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lee, Honglak  Machine Learning  

Michigan Shines at the National Robotics Initiative 5 Year Anniversary

Professor Jessy Grizzle took part in a full day of events celebrating the fifth anniversary of the National Robotics Initiative (NRI) on June 9, 2016. "It was very exciting to meet fellow robotics researchers and to share our work with members of Congress," said Prof. Grizzle, who appreciates all that the NRI has done for the field. However, he agrees that robotics research needs to increase to match that of our global competitors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

MHybrid Races On

The Michigan Hybrid Racing (MHybrid) team took their latest creation to the Formula Hybrid Competition at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in May, led in part by seniors Gwynn Cunningham (team captain), Vicky Cheung, Jake Moline, Jeffrey Lu, and Guanlun He. The MHybrid team members took away memorable experiences and have turned a positive eye toward the future - with graduates anticipating new careers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

The Future of Transportation

The National Academy of Engineering held a regional meeting at Michigan focusing on driverless cars and connected transportation. Read more about Big Data for Transportation, led by Prof. Al Hero; Cybersecurity for Transportation, led by Prof. Kang G. Shin; and the overall program. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Software Systems  Shin, Kang G.  

Injectable Computers Can Broadcast from Inside the Body

Profs. David Blaauw and David Wenzloff are designing millimeter-scale ultra-low-power sensing systems that can be injected into the body through a syringe. Unlike other radios of this size, these new devices are able to broadcast through the human body to an external receiver. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Tony Fadell Steps Down from Nest

What's the future for Tony Fadell now that he's left Nest? His investments give some insights: synthesized beef, drone operating systems, sensors for drug trials, and semiconductor-based heating and cooling. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

David Chesney Awarded Funding to Research Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury

A team of researchers, including Dr. David Chesney and co-PI Dr. Rodney C. Daniels (Pediatric Critical Care) received funding for their research proposal at the Massey Foundation Traumatic Brain injury (TBI) Grand Challenge Pitch Day, which took place April 29th. Their research proposal was one of five U-M research proposals that were selected to receive funding. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Technology and Wellness  

This "Demonically Clever" Backdoor Hides in a Tiny Slice of a Computer Chip

This article in Wired describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates how a hacker could hide a malicious backdoor in silicon and trigger it to gain access to a computing system. Google engineer Yonatan Zunger is quoted as saying "This is the most demonically clever computer security attack Ive seen in years." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Undetectable proof-of-concept chip poisoning uses analog circuits to escalate privilege

In this article, Cory Doctorow describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates a "novel, frightening attack on the integrity of microprocessors." The paper describes the attack, which is nearly undetectable, and how it can lead to full control of a computing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Tomas Mauricio Named A Difference Maker

Tomas Mauricio has been named a Difference Maker at UM-Dearborn. UM-Dearborn Difference Makers are identified annually as students that are at the forefront of their fields, improving the lives of others and making an impact in our local communities. Tomas, a current student at UM-Dearborn, is working as a program assistant for ECE during the summer of 2016. His primary activities are to assist with the Electrify Tech Camps and Family Night program. [Full Story]

Michigan and Verisign Researchers Demonstrate New Man-in-the-Middle WPAD Query Attack

Security researchers including Prof. Z. Morley Mao and CSE graduate student Qi Alfred Chen have demonstrated that new security ramifications exist when laptops and smartphones configured for enterprise systems and using generic top-level domains are used outside the enterprise in the realm of the wider web. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Beyond Asimov: How to Plan for Ethical Robots

In The Converstation, Prof. Ben Kuipers discusses the moral and ethical guidelines we should give robots as they soon will be a part of our daily lives. He delves into past moral rules and the complex situation of guiding robot behavior in our society. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Robotics  

Igor Markov and Collaborators Issue Second Edition of EDA Handbook

Professor Igor Markov and his co-editors Luciano Lavagno, Grant E. Martin, and Louis K. Scheffer have issued the second edition of the two-volume "Electronic Design Automation for Integrated Circuits Handbook," which has been published by CRC Press. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Quora Knowledge Prize Winner Igor Markov Presents Winning Answer To Packed House at MLConf

Prof. Igor Markov was a featured speaker at the ML Conference, which took place May 20 in Seattle. His talk, entitled "Can AI Become a Dystopian Threat to Humanity? A Hardware Perspective," expanded on his answer to a Quora question on AI threats that won a Knowledge prize and another answer regarding how to identify chatbots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Machine Learning  Markov, Igor  

Novel collaboration to probe brain activity in unprecedented detail

A pilot program led by Prof. Euisik Yoon will regularly bring together researchers with complementary expertise from different universities to collaborate on advancing research that may lead to a better understanding of the human brain and diseases that affect it. Yoon has been leading a key development of the Michigan Probe, a revolutionary tiny solid-state microsystem developed at U-M that can be used to probe the inner workings of the brain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  LEDs  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Yoon, Euisik  

Security Risks in the Age of Smart Homes

CSE graduate student Earlence Fernandes writes about the security risks of connected homes in this article at The Conversation. Earlence is part of a research team that included Prof. Atul Prakash and Jaeyeon Jung of Microsoft, which exposed security flaws in Samsung's popular SmartThings product offerings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  

Alumnus Shrenik Mehta to Receive Leadership Award at DAC2016

Accellera Systems Initiative (Accellera), the electronics industry organization focused on the creation and adoption of electronic design automation (EDA) and intellectual property (IP) standards, announced that Shrenik Mehta (MSE CICE 1984) is the recipient of the fifth annual Accellera Leadership Award. The award recognizes Shreniks vision, leadership and contribution to standards development, governance and promotional activities on behalf of the organization. Shrenik is Strategic Programs Director at Synopsys. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Rada Mihalcea Coauthors New Book on Text Mining

Professor Rada Mihalcea and her collaborator Gabe Ignatow, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of North Texas, have authored a new book entitled "Text Mining: A Guidebook for the Social Sciences," which has been published by Sage Publishing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Computational Linguistics  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Michael Wellman Appointed Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the College of Engineering

Michael P. Wellman, the Lynn A. Conway Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, has been selected to serve as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the College of Engineering, effective July 1, 2016. He succeeds Alec Gallimore, who will become the new Dean at the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Pressure-Sensing Smartphones: Software Lets Mobile Devices Feel Force

Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, and CSE graduate student Yu-Chih Tung have developed ForcePhone, software that allows smartphones to sense force or pressure on its screen or body. They envision many uses for their technology, which could offer the masses a coveted feature of the latest generation of smartphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Shin, Kang G.  

Diabetes in Control: An Interview with Eran Bashan of Hygieia

In an interview with Diabetes in Control, Eran Bashan gave an overview of the d-Nav, an automated solution for insulin management that tailors the insulin regimen to the individual needs of the patient. Eran is CEO and co-founder of Hygieia, and has demonstrated his ability to bring products from ideation to commercialization.
Watch Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  Health  

Alfred O. Hero, III Named John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor of EECS

Alfred O. Hero, III, R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, has been named the John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in acknowledgement of his extraordinary accomplishments that have brought distinction to himself, his students, and to the entire University. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Systems  

Nan Jiang Receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research on Reinforcement Learning

Nan Jiang, a CSE PhD candidate, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research while he completes his dissertation, which is entitled, A Theory of Model Selection in Batch Reinforcement Learning. The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program who are unusually creative, ambitious and risk-taking. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Fighting Cyber Crime with Data Analytics

Companies like Sony, JP Morgan Chase, Target, and even some state universities have had sensitive information like credit card numbers and account logins leaked, resulting in far-reaching economic consequences for countless households. Prof. Liu co-founded QuadMetrics to keep companies diligent when it comes to cybersecurity. QuadMetrics offers a pair of services to help companies both assess the effectiveness of their security and decide the best way to allocate (or increase) their security budget. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Entrepreneurship  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  

New Student Team Designs and Builds Unique New Instruments

ECE undergrads Sophia Mehdizadeh and Kiran Thawardas helped lead a brand new interdisciplinary student design team, Project Music, through its first year. This team designs and builds their own unique musical instruments, and gives its members the chance to make music together. This year the team built an electric bass out of LEGOs, and now they're planning an electric violin for next year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

M-FLY Debuts Two Planes at SAE Competition, Finishes Top 10

M-FLY, an interdisciplinary student team dedicated to designing competitive aircraft, brought two of its planes to the 2016 SAE Aero Design Competition East in Fort Worth, Texas in March. Entering both the regular and advanced class competitions, Jacob Gersh, Sophia Mehdizadeh, and Vaibhav Parashar, electrical engineering students, helped the team finish top 10 in both categories, including a first-place oral competition finish. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Science on Tap to feature talk on the unexpected properties of ordinary materials

Babak Ziaie (MSE PhD EE 91 94) will headline next week's Science on Tap at Purdue University with a discussion on the untapped potential of everyday materials. Ziaie has done multiple kitchen-top experiments with Magic Tape, and has discovered intriguing properties that can be used to make inexpensive sensors and tiny robots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Tony Fadell: How Can We Design For A Better Experience?

Tony Fadell (BSE CE 91), the designer behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat, delivered a TED Talk on why design is in the details and why designers often get those details wrong. Tony Fadell is a co-founder of Nest. He led the team that created the first 18 generations of the iPod and the first three generations of the iPhone. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  

Student Team Works to Improve Care for Premature Infants

Meghna Menon, a sophomore in EE, and Mihir Sheth, Masters student in EE:Systems, designed a heated incubator to help keep low birth weight and premature infants warm and healthy as part of the student group, M-HEAL (Michigan Health Engineered for All Lives). Findings show that maintaining the heart rate and body temperature of low birth weight and premature infants saves lives. The pair recently traveled with four other team members to compete in Rice Universitys Rice 360 Design Competition. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Health  Student Teams and Organizations  Sustainability  Undergraduate Students  

High-efficiency power amplifier could bring 5G cell phones

Alumnus Saeed Mohammadi (PhD EE 00) is working on a new highly efficient power amplifier for electronics that could help make possible next-generation cell phones, low-cost collision-avoidance radar for cars and lightweight microsatellites for communications. Saeed is an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Sony Wants to Push AIs to Learn From Their Own Experiences

Sony has invested in AI startup Cogitai to build intelligent systems that will learn from their own experiences in the world. Prof. Satinder Singh, the co-founder of Cogitai, discusses continual learning and the future of intelligent systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

CSE Sponsors TechTwilight to Support Young People in STEM

CSE is a sponsor of the 2016 TechTwilight. TechTwilight provides companies and student groups with the opportunity to celebrate and share their innovations in a festive environment of discovery. The event encourages young people to pursue careers in, and develop life-long interests in, science, technology, and engineering. [Full Story]

Malware Attacks Putting Patients' Medical Records at Risk

Prof. Kevin Fu talks to Michigan Radio about the recent news stories regarding some U.S. hospitals being hit by malware attacks. When hospitals are hit, patient records can be in danger. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

More Than 30 States Offer Online Voting, but Experts Warn it isnt Secure

This article revisits the question of online voting. Prof. Halderman cites a pilot project from six years ago in DC where the public was invited to attack a proposed Internet voting system. Halderman led a team that within 48 hours was able to gain nearly complete control of the server and change every vote. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

A cross-cultural journey ends with a life in Fairbanks for ECE alum

Johnny Mendez (BSE EE 95) is influenced by several cultures. Although raised in Venezuela where his father is from, Mendezs mother is Armenian. He moved to Canada while his father did post-doc studies, and eventually made his way to South Carolina for high school and Michigan for his degree in EE. Johnny Mendez was bitten by Alaska while selling posters one summer in Michigan, and made the move to Fairbanks with his wife after graduation. He now works as an engineer in the drinking water program at the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

MARLO the bipedal robot makes worldwide news coverage with her new steps

Jessy Grizzle and his students have their latest two-legged robot, MARLO, walking well over difficult terrain. The story started out on popular tech blogs and magazines like Engadget, Popular Science, VICE Motherboard, Gizmag and CNET. It was also covered by international English language publications such as the Daily Mail, International Business Times, the BBC, and the Canadian Discovery Channel (Daily Planet show). Other international coverage included French, Danish and Czech sites. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

Michael P. Wellman Named Lynn A. Conway Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Michael P. Wellman has been named the Lynn A. Conway Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering in recognition of his outstanding contributions in the areas of research, education, and leadership. This appointment was celebrated at a ceremony which took place on May 5, 2016. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Fawwaz Ulaby Among the Best at Michigan for Inspiring Students

Fawwaz Ulaby, Emmett Leith Distinguished University Professor, was ranked one of the 10 best faculty of the 4,000+ at Michigan for keeping students awake, inspired, and motivated to work hard in his classes. Ulaby strongly believes in building relationships with his students and wants to get to know them as individuals rather than just students, and it pays off. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Ulaby, Fawwaz  

MARLO, the free-standing two-legged robot, conquers terrain with innovative control algorithms

MARLO, the free-standing bipedal robot developed by Prof. Jessy Grizzle's group, can now walk down steep slopes, through a thin layer of snow, and over uneven and unstable ground. The robots feedback control algorithms should be able to help other two-legged robots as well as powered prosthetic legs gain similar capabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

Stephen Forrest Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Stephen Forrest, internationally-renowned researcher, educator, and entrepreneur, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Membership in the NAS is one of the highest distinctions for a scientist or engineer in the United States. Steve Forrest is the Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Making Memory Smaller, Better, Faster, Stronger

As tiny embedded computers spread to every item in the home and beyond - fast, reliable memory is needed on an unheard-of scale. To fuel this ongoing revolution, Prof. Wei Lu and former student Dr. Sung Hyun Jo co-founded the company Crossbar, Inc. to tackle the physical limitations of conventional memory technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Embedded Computing and Systems  Entrepreneurship  Internet of Things  LNF  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Technology Transfer  

Google, U-M to Build Digital Tools for Flint Water Crisis

A partnership between Google and the University of Michigans Ann Arbor and Flint campuses aims to provide a smartphone app and other digital tools to Flint residents and officials to help them manage the ongoing water crisis. The Michigan Data Science Team, led by CSE Prof. Jacob Abernethy, will be involved in the partnership. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Lab-Theory of Computation  

EECS 183 Showcase Highlights Another Round of Final Projects

On Thursday, April 21st, students, parents, and professors attended the EECS 183 Showcase at Palmer Commons. Non-CS students from EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, presented what they learned about CS this semester in a day-long showcase that featured over 150 projects made by over 600 students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Undergraduate Students  

Hacking into Homes: Security Flaws Found in SmartThings Connected Home System

Prof. Atul Prakash, CSE graduate student Earlence Fernandes, and Jaeyeon Jung (Microsoft Research), have performed a security analysis of the SmartThings programming framework. They were able to hack into the automation system and essentially get the PIN code to a homes front door. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Award-Winning EECS 2016 Graduate Student Instructors & Instructional Aides Recognized

The EECS Department held its annual Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) / Instructional Aide (IA) Awards Ceremony on April 28 to honor top student instructors and aides for their remarkable service and excellence in teaching. ECE and CSE Associate Chairs Dave Neuhoff and Scott Mahlke hosted the event and introduced the awardees. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Mahlke, Scott  Neuhoff, David L.  

Students Make Connections at NSBE National Convention

The 42nd Annual Convention of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) brought members together in Boston, MA for career fairs, competitions, professional workshops, networking events, and elections. Forty three U-M engineers, six from EECS, attended the convention, themed Engineering a Cultural Change. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Undergraduate Students  

Students earn prizes for improving image processing techniques in EECS 556

Two teams earned prizes in the graduate level course, EECS 556: Image Processing, thanks to the sponsorship of KLA-Tencor. The course, taught this past term by Prof. Jeff Fessler, covers the theory and application of digital image processing, with applications in biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics, and optics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  

David Chesney Receives 2016 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize

Dr. David Chesney has been awarded the 2016 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize, which recognizes faculty who have developed an innovative project. For many years, Chesney has suggested that his students think in terms of social good when developing their projects. Through his courses, students are able to learn the fundamentals of programming and software systems, while also seeing the social impact of computer science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  

Students receive prizes for simulating the best landing of a rocket booster

Students in EECS 562, Nonlinear Systems and Control, received prizes for calculating how to land a rocket booster with minimal damage after being detached during a rocket launch. They competed with students who were taking a similar class at Carnegie Mellon University. Professor Jessy Grizzle's former PhD student and CMU professor, Koushil Sreenath (PhD EE:S 2011), designed the project last year, inspired by a real-world problem. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  

Girls Encoded Motivates Students to Study CS

For the second year in a row, over 100 high school girls and their parents attended Girls Encoded, an all day event designed to educate and encourage girls to study computer science. The event took place Saturday, April 9th and was co-directed by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, CSE research fellow Veronica Perez-Rosas, and CS student Lauren Molley. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Das, Reetuparna  Diversity and Outreach  Mihalcea, Rada  

Jeff Fessler Receives 2016 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Technical Achievement Award

Jeffrey Fessler, William L. Root Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has been selected to receive the 2016 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) Technical Achievement Award, "For fundamental and pioneering contributions to the theory and algorithms of statistical reconstruction methods of the PET/ SPECT, CT and MRI medical imaging modalities. His research has already touched the lives of countless patients through safer imaging and improved diagnoses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  

World's fastest silicon-based flexible transistor

Zhenqiang (Jack) Ma, ECE alumnus and Lynn H. Matthias Professor in Engineering and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in ECE at the University of Wisconsin, reportedly fabricated the worlds fastest silicon-based flexible transistor. He collaborated on this research with Prof. Jay Guo and Tao Ling (PhD EE 2011), now at TE Connectivity. Michigan's role was to use the nanoimprint technique to pattern the transistor channel region. The research was published in Nature Scientific Reports. See also the University of Washington press release. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  

Beth Lawson Receives CoE Excellence in Staff Service Award

Beth Lawson, Senior Research Administrator for Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), received a 2016 College of Engineering Excellence in Staff Service Award for her 18 years of sustained excellence serving the faculty in the Systems area. Faculty praised Beth's willingness to provide a high level of support to new and senior faculty alike, her ability to work well with other departments and institutions, and her unflappable calm in the face of sometimes dramatic changes in budgets and entire proposals. She is also a consummate professional as a manager of the Systems area. [Full Story]

Your Devices' Latest Feature? They Can Spy on Your Every Move

In The Converstation, Prof. HV Jagadish sheds light on how smart devices are a gateway for hackers to spy on you. Since devices are networked, they can communicate in ways we dont want them to and people can take control of these technologies to learn private information about you. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

For Michigan Professor, Computer Science is Much More Than a Job

This article reports on Prof. Jason Mars and his work in developing technologies for intelligent personal assistants, from the software for the assistants themselves to the servers that are required to run such software. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

CSE Alumna Arzucan Ozgur Receives Science Academy Young Scientist Award

Arzucan Ozgur (PhD CSE 2010) has been awarded a Science Academy Young Scientist Award (BAGEP 2016, Turkey). Arzucan is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Engineering at Bogazici University in Istanbul. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

5 big challenges that self-driving cars still have to overcome

in this article, Prof. Edwin Olson comments on what are seen are the key challenges involved in deploying autonomous or assistive driving technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Kimberly Mann Receives CoE Excellence in Staff Service Award

Kimberly Mann, CSE AI Lab Research Administrator, has been selected to receive a 2016 College of Engineering Excellence in Staff Service Award. Each year, CoE recognizes sustained excellence in staff who have made significant contributions or possess special qualities and attributes that foster teamwork and achievement. [Full Story]

Audrow Nash Earns NSF Fellowship for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Research

Audrow Nash, a Master's student in EE:Systems, has been awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for his work developing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to monitor biogas emissions in landfills. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  Olson, Edwin  Robotics  

Marcus Darden Voted HKN Professor of the Year for CSE

EECS students voted, and Dr. Marcus Darden was named the 2015-2016 HKN Professor of the Year in CSE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Darden, Marcus  Undergraduate Students  

Jeff Fessler Voted HKN Professor of the Year for ECE

The student votes were counted, and Jeffrey Fessler, William L. Root Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, was named the 2015-2016 HKN Professor of the Year in ECE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Walter Lasecki and Collaborators Win Best Paper at W4A

A team of four researchers including Prof. Walter Lasecki has won a Best Paper Award at the Web for All (W4A) Conference for "The Effects of Automatic Speech Recognition Quality on Human Transcription Latency," which explores how automated speech recognition and crowd-sourced human correction and generation of transcripts can be traded off to improve accuracy and latency. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Accessibility  Big Data  Interactive Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

Sean Stetson Joins Seegrid

Alumnus Sean Stetson (PhD EE 98) has been appointed director of product development at Seegrid. Seegrid is a developer of 3D vision navigation and automation technology, focused on turning pallet trucks and tow tractors into driverless vision guided vehicles. Sean previously worked at Google, where he served as the director for mobile imaging in the advanced technology and projects division. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

CSE Launches Health Initiative for Staff

To foster an environment of wellness in the spirit of the University's MHealthy program, the CSE Division is tapping the power of computation to help encourage healthy behavior amongst its administrative and support staff. [Full Story]

GridWatch Named Finalist in Vodafone's Eighth Annual Wireless Innovation Competition

GridWatch, a system for monitoring the state of the power grid using smartphones, has been selected as a finalist in the Vodafone Americas Foundation's Wireless Innovation Project competition. GridWatch is a collaboration between researchers at UM and UC Berkeley; the Michigan researchers include Prof. Prabal Dutta and graduate students Noah Klugman, Pat Pannuto, and William Huang. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Energy Science and Engineering  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

IEEE Spectrum Video Friday: Printable Hydraulic Robots, Medical Delivery Drones, and Romeo Walks

Video Friday is IEEE Spectrum's weekly selection of awesome robotics videos. Jessy Grizzle's MARLO was featured for a second week in a row, this time tackling an even bigger stack of precarious boards and obstacles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

IEEE Spectrum Video Friday: Autonomous Pizza Delivery, Handwriting Robot, and ROS Master

Video Friday is IEEE Spectrum's weekly selection of awesome robotics videos. This week featured a clip of Jessy Grizzle's MARLO undergoing some tricky walking exercises. The biped power through stacks of boards and other elevated obstacles without missing a beat. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Dropping USB Drives Is the Easiest Trick Hackers Can Use - And You're Probably a Sucker

Researchers including CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have discovered a highly effective security hack to gain access to others' computing systems - leaving USB flash drives with malicious payloads laying on the ground. In their study, they found there is a nearly 50% chance that someone will pick up a given drive, plug it into their computer, and start clicking. This presents the opportunity for malware to be activated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Alumna Jennifer Rexford Named 2016-2017 Athena Lecturer by ACM-W

Alumna Jennifer Rexford (CSE MSE 93 PHD 96), the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor of Engineering and Chair of the Computer Science Department at Princeton University, has been named the 2016-2017 Athena Lecturer by CRA-W for her work in improving Internet transmissions and making data networks easier to manage. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Jacob Abernethy: Machine Learning and the Wisdom of the Crowd

The National Science Foundation reports on the work of Prof. Jacob Abernethy, who is investigating the relationship between machine learning algorithms and market economy dynamics to develop socially beneficial forecasts. His work in this area is supported by a CAREER Award from NSF. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Economic Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Pressure Profile Systems, Inc. (PPS) Announces Appointment of Howard Goldberg as Executive Vice President of Operations

Pressure Profile Systems, Inc., the world-leader in distributed pressure sensing technologies for OEM products and instrumentation, announced that it had appointed Dr. Howard Goldberg (MSE PhD EE 89 93) as its Executive Vice President of Operations. Dr. Goldberg is the former President and COO of Interlink Electronics (OTC: LINK), where he achieved a 36% increase in 2014 revenue. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Visionary Engineer Lynn Conway Heralds Dawn of the Techno-Social Age

At Columbia University Engineering's annual Magill Lecture, pioneering engineer and computer scientist Lynn Conway said, "Humanity stands at the cusp of a new technological and social renaissance." Conway, professor emerita of computer science and electrical engineering at the University of Michigan, is a pioneer of microelectronics chip design. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

Mark Kushner Receives Honorary Doctorate, is Appointed Distinguished Professor, and is Appointed Distinguished Lecturer of Plasma Physics

Prof. Mark Kushner will receive an Honorary Doctorate at Eindhoven University of Technology and has been appointed Distinguished Professor from the same university. [READ MORE] He has also been appointed a 2016 Distinguished Lecturer for the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. [READ MORE]
Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

CSE Graduate Student Vidal Borromeo Recognized with CoE Towner Prize

CSE graduate student Vidal Borromeo has been selected to receive a 2016 Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors by the College of Engineering. Vidal is currently the GSI for EECS 381, where he makes use of innovative learning techniques to raise the level of engagement and to help students to remember key concepts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

University Collaborates with Toyota on Autonomous Vehicle Hub

Toyota and Michigan have announced a new research collaboration that will involve a new Toyota facility, Mcity, and two faculty with appointments in CSE: Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

ECE Volunteer Brings M-HEAL Solutions to Peru

Leila Syal, a sophomore in Electrical Engineering, organized an alternative spring break trip with M-HEAL (Michigan Health Engineered for All Lives) to Cusco, Peru. This trip was a part of the groups Service Abroad and Needs Assessment (SANA) program, and the 15 participating students had the opportunity to do medical volunteer work around the city. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Nobel Laureate Shuji Nakamura Delivers Dow Distinguished Lecture (with video)

Professor Shuji Nakamura delivered the 17th Wiliam Gould Dow Distinguished Lecture, "Road Toward the New Light: The Invention of High Efficient Blue LEDs and Future Lighting," on April 5, 2016. Prof. Nakamura is the 2014 Nobel Laureate in Physics for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes, which enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Norris, Theodore B.  

Clark Zhang Earns NSF Fellowship for Data Processing in MEMS Networks

Clark Zhang, a senior in Computer Engineering, has earned an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for his research proposal on gathering useful data from MEMS sensor systems. This summer, he is working as an intern at NASAs Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There, hell be a part of a project called Resilient Spacecraft Architecture, which works to make the autonomous systems on spacecraft more robust and willing to take risks without an operator intervening. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  MEMS and Microsystems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  Undergraduate Students  

Engineering a Better Life for People with Diabetes

Eran Bashan (PhD EE:S 08) decided to tackle the way diabetes was treated. So he co-founded Hygieia with friend and colleague, Dr. Israel Hodish, in 2008. Hygieia does two key things for its patients; it develops medical devices that automatically evaluate and optimize insulin dosage, and it provides patient consulting and training that is carried out by on-staff nurses, reducing the need for frequent trips to the doctor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  Fessler, Jeffrey  Health  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Systems  

Joshua Adkins Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Joshua Adkins, a senior in Computer Engineering, has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. While at Michigan, Josh has worked with Prof. Prabal Dutta in Lab 11, the Embedded Systems Lab in CSE. His research interests lie in the areas of embedded systems, ubiquitous computing, and energy harvesting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Undergraduate Students  

Genevieve Flaspohler Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Genevieve Flaspohler, a senior in Computer Engineering, has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. During the past four years, Genevieve has been involved in a number of interdisciplinary research projects related to embedded systems at Michigan, working with faculty in Mechanical Engineering and with Prof. Prabal Dutta in CSE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Undergraduate Students  

Ryan Marcotte Selected for NSF and NDSEG Graduate Research Fellowships

CSE graduate student Ryan Marcotte has been selected for two prestigious graduate fellowships to support his ongoing studies in computer science and engineering. The fellowships are from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program and the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship from the Department of Defense. Ryan works with Prof. Edwin Olson in the APRIL Lab, where his research is in the area of multi-agent search algorithms for both known and unexplored environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Olson, Edwin  

With Hospital Ransomware Infections, the Patients Are at Risk

The article in MIT Technology Review quotes Prof. Kevin Fu on the recent string of ransomware attacks against hospitals. Prof. Fu's research is in the area of security for medical equipment, from implanted devices through bedside monitoring equipment, medical diagnostic equipment, and medical IT systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Malware Attacks On Hospitals Put Patients At Risk

The article at NPR describes recent cases in which hospitals became the victims of ransomware attacks. Prof. Kevin Fu, an expert on the security vulnerabilities of medical equipment, is quoted. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Fall 2016: Introduction to Autonomous Robotics

Course No.: EECS 398-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Chad Jenkins
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course covers the essentials of robot modeling and autonomy. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Fundamentals of the Internet

Course No.: EECS 398-001
Credit Hours: 2 credits
Instructor: Mohammed Islam
Prerequisites: None

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the internet. You use the internet every day, and in this house we permit you to "look under the hood" of the internet. By taking this course you will have a better appreciation of how computer networks work and how your computer communicates over the internet. [More Info]

CSE at South by Southwest

U-M attended the 2016 South by Southwest festival in Austin, and CSE participated in showing off another round of innovative technologies. South by Southwest began as a small film and music festival and has grown to become one of the biggest arts and technology fests in the country. Spanning two weeks and a half-dozen conferences in Austin, Texas, it brought together executives and creative types from industries ranging from tech to gaming to music to movies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2016: Electric Distribution Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Johanna Mathieu
Prerequisites: EECS 463

Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of electric power distribution systems and electric loads. Topics to be covered include introduction to distribution grids, power flow in distribution grids, distribution transformers, fundamentals of electric loads, and electric load modeling. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Hybrid Systems: Specification, Verification and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Necmiye Ozay
Prerequisites: EECS 562 or (EECS 560 + permission of instructor)

Course Description:
This course will provide a working knowledge of several analysis and design techniques to guarantee safety, reliability and performance of hybrid systems. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Mining Large-Scale Graph Data

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Danai Koutra
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of linear algebra, programming and machine learning

Course Description:
This course will cover recent methods and algorithms for analyzing large-scale graphs, as well as applications in various domains (e.g., neuroscience, web science, social science, computer networks). The focus will be on scalable and practical methods, and students will have the chance to analyze large-scale datasets. [More Info]

Startup Co-founded by Prof. Kevin Fu Gets NSF Grant

Healthcare security company Virta Laboratories, Inc, co-founded by Prof. Kevin Fu, has received a $750,000 grant from the National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Virta Labs provides hardware and software cybersecurity solutions for hospitals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

It's Official: Computer Science is #1... and #2!

Computer science is a fast-growing discipline with huge potential for impact, and this is clearly reflected at the University of Michigan in terms of two measurements: the number of declared majors in the undergraduate program, and the employment survey data available from student co-ops, interns, and full-time hires. [Full Story]

UM professors, students lead startup with real-world uses for AI technology

This article profiles Clinc, the artificial intelligence startup founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang with CSE graduate students Michael Laurenzano and Johann Hauswald. Clinc is based in Ann Arbor and uses intelligent personal assistant technology to fuel new applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Fall 2016: Power Semiconductor Devices

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Becky Peterson
Prerequisites: EECS 320 or equivalent or graduate standing

Course Description:
Power devices are at the heart of all modern electronics, from the grid and renewable energy sources to fuel-efficient vehicles and mobile devices. This course will cover semiconductor switches and rectifiers for discrete and integrated power electronics. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Advanced Topics in Electric Drives

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Heath Hofmann
Prerequisites: EECS 560 (co-requisite)

Course Description:
This course will cover advanced topics in electric drives, such as:

* Nonlinear modeling of electric machines, and subsequent controller design

*Discrete-time control implementations of field-oriented control techniques

*Real-time parameter estimation for online condition monitoring of electric machines

Students will gain hands-on experience with these techniques in the Power and Energy Instructional Laboratory. The course will have a final project where students will design and implement their own control algorithm. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Quantum Nanotechnology

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Duncan Steel
Prerequisites: MATH 215 and 216, PHYSICS 240, co-req EECS 230 or permission

Course Description:
The development and application of nano-technology is impacting nearly all the fields of engineering, from those who are developing it to those who use it. Future engineers working to design new devices will need a skill set that is considerably broadened to include the behavior of materials and devices when they become sufficiently small. Devices like transistors and quantum well lasers have already forced engineers to understand the impact of Fermi-Dirac statistics and energy quantization on devices. However, the emergent field of nano-technology is revealing that the concepts we have from our current scale devices is no longer adequate to predict correct device experience. Moreover, in this new regime, new physical properties are emerging that may revolutionize how we think of information and its storage, transmission and processing. This course aims to introduce students to basic concepts in quantum physics that our relevant to novel device concepts. The course will explore the new properties of nano-vibrators, quantum LC circuits, the role of loss, the impact of the quantum vacuum on nano-switches, coherent superposition, quantum entanglement and light, one photon at a time. [More Info]

Fall 2016: An Introduction to Networks

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Vijay Subramanian
Prerequisites: EECS 203 and EECS 301 (or equivalent) recommended

Course Description:
This course serves as an introduction to the broad class of networks: how these networks are connected, how they form, how processes and transactions take place on them, and how they are being transformed and interconnected in the modern world. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Learn to be a Software Consultant

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Elliot Soloway
Prerequisites: Senior status in CSE

Course Description:
As part of UMichs Innovate Blue, the School of Information offers a Design Clinic (see description below) where budding entrepreneurs come with software projects and receive UI/UX consulting from SI students. However, the entrepreneurs oftentimes have questions about software design and development (questions about prototyping tools, underlying architecture, etc.).

In this 498, then, CSE students would serve two 2.5 hour/week shifts in the Design Clinic providing software design/development consulting to entrepreneurs and they would create template apps as demos; in addition, CSE students will participate in learning sessions with the other consultants. CSE students will develop consulting skills as they provide real consulting to users of the Design Clinic.

Requirements: Senior Status in the CSE major. For permission to register, please contact Elliot Soloway: soloway@umich.edu [More Info]

Numbers Game

This article in Michigan Research examines the growing importance of sports analytics and describes the work of Prof. Jenna Wiens in using machine learning to extract information from NBA sports data for automatically recognizing common defense strategies to ball screens. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Jeff Fessler Named William L. Root Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Jeff Fessler has been named the William L. Root Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in recognition of his outstanding contributions in the areas of research, education, and leadership. Jeff is one of the most accomplished researchers of medical image reconstruction in the world. His group has produced breakthroughs in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT), and radionuclide imaging (PET/SPECT). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Lab-Systems  Medical Imaging  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Google Self-Driving Car Will Be Ready Soon for Some, in Decades for Others

This article reports on a talk given by Chris Urmson, Google self-driving car project director, at the SXSW conference, in which he seemed to reset expectations regarding the arrival autonomous vehicles. The article includes comments by Prof. Edwin Olson, who researches self-driving cars at UM and who is quite familiar with the technical challenges that remain to be addressed before such vehicles become ubiquitous. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

2015-16 EECS Undergraduate Student Awards

Students, parents, and faculty gathered on Friday, March 11, 2016 to celebrate the achievements of EECS students who earned special awards for academic achievement, research, service, or entrepreneurial activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Fundamental science will play a key role in finding cancer cure

Prof. David Blaauw is part of a team that NSF recently funded to develop millimeter-sized, ultra-low-power electronic biosensors for implantation in tumors to determine chemotherapy impacts. Monitoring of tumor micro-environments during therapy could inform chemotherapy duration, result in more successful chemotherapy and advance the science of implantable biosensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Cancer  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Yu-Wei Chao Selected for Google PhD Fellowship

CSE graduate student Yu-Wei Chao has been selected to receive a Google PhD Fellowship for the 2016-17 academic year. Yu-Wei was chosen as a Google Fellow on the basis of his work in computer vision and machine learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

U-M Researchers Launch Fight Against C. difficile with $9.2M Grant from NIH

CSE Prof. Jenna Wiens is a part of the U-M research team that has launched a $9.2 million effort to prevent and treat C. difficile infections. The team was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health, which is part of the U.S. governments $1.2 billion effort for a multi-agency attack on antibiotic-resistant bacteria. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Machine Learning Proves Useful for Analyzing NBA Ball Screen Defense

A research team including Avery McIntyre (December 2015 alumnus of the undergraduate CS program at Michigan) and Prof. Jenna Wiens has used machine learning to extract information from NBA sports data for automatically recognizing common defense strategies to ball screens. They shared their findings at the 10th MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference in Boston. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

MEMS research to assist in treatment of glaucoma selected as a featured article

The paper, Resonant magnetoelastic microstructures for wireless actuation of liquid flow on 3D surfaces and use in glaucoma drainage implants, by Venkatram Pepakayala, Joshua Stein and Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani, was selected as a Featured Article in the journal, Microsystems & Nanoengineering. The researchers created wireless MEMS actuators that facilitate the flow of fluids on the surface of implantable glaucoma drainage devices that help lower eye pressure.
Related Topics:  Gianchandani, Yogesh  MEMS and Microsystems  WIMS/WIMS2  

MEMS Fabrication Research Highlighted by the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering

The paper, A Fabrication Process for the Monolithic Integration of Magnetoelastic Actuators and Silicon Sensors, by Jun Tang, Dr. Scott Green, and Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani has been selected as one of the 2015 Highlights of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. The researchers achieved a microfabrication process that can be used for specific types of MEMS motors used in wireless sensing systems on a silicon substrate.
Related Topics:  Gianchandani, Yogesh  MEMS and Microsystems  WIMS/WIMS2  

Company cracked code for battery-less tech

It's not news to say experts believe nearly every "thing" bicycles, toasters, eyeglasses, clothing, lampposts will eventually use embedded chips, or sensors, to connect wirelessly to everything else, said Crain's Detroit Business. The story reports on the startup company, PsiKick, co-founded by Prof. David Wentzloff. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

Doowon Lee Receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to Improve the Reliability of Computer Systems

Doowon Lee, a CSE PhD candidate, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research while he completes his dissertation, which is entitled, Low-Cost Comprehensive Robustness for Modern Heterogeneous Systems. The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program who are unusually creative, ambitious and risk-taking. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Xiang Yin Earns Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Xiang Yin, PhD student in ECE, has been awarded a Rackham Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for his research with Prof. Stphane Lafortune in the field of cyber-physical systems and discrete-event systems. Xiangs research focuses on developing new methods to synthesize different control and sensing strategies in a discrete-event system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Lafortune, Stephane  

Amr Ibrahim Earns Rackham Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for Research in Sub-Millimeterwave Radar Systems

Amr Ibrahim, a PhD student in ECE, has been awarded a Rackham Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for his research with Prof. Kamal Sarabandi on sub-millimeterwave radar systems for imaging and navigation applications. Amr is investigating both the unique advantages and the performance limitations of radar systems operating at 240 GHz in typical outdoor environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Claude Shannon centennial celebrants recall U-M grad's advances, societal impact

April 30 will be the 100th birthday for Claude Shannon, the Father of Information Theory. "Claude Shannon is the founder of the theory of information and communication. These contributions were singularly important in that they led directly to the digital revolution that powers our electronic world," said Prof. Alfred Hero. Prof. Hero and Prof. Dave Neuhoff are helping to plan a workshop this fall to celebrate the centennial of his birth. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Avish Kosari Selected as Barbour Scholar for Research in Low-Power Devices for the Internet of Things

Avish Kosari, PhD student in ECE, was selected to be a Barbour Scholar by the Rackham Graduate School. Avish conducts research on ultra-low power and battery-less integrated circuits. She is a member of the wireless integrated circuits and systems group, directed by Prof. David Wentzloff, designing devices that will help enable the Internet of Things and a connected world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Remote Sensing  Wentzloff, David  

Attack against TLS shows the pitfalls of weakening encryption

This article describes how, for the third time in a year, security researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have found a method to attack encrypted Web communications, a direct result of weaknesses that were mandated two decades ago by the U.S. government. The latest instance is the DROWN attack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

'Thousands of popular sites' at risk of Drown hack attacks

This article describes how researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have discovered a new way to disable popular internet encryption protocols. Their "DROWN" attack takes advantage of past government rules against strong encryption in technology to be exported. The rules have since changed, but the effects live on. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Drown attack: how weakened encryption jeopardizes 'secure' sites

This article describes how researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have succeeded in attacking "secure" connections that are used in email, news and entertainment services. The article notes that the technique could affect up to one third of all websites that use secure communications and is a legacy of past efforts to water down online encryption. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

A better 3D camera with clear, graphene light detectors

A camera that can record 3D images and video is under development, with $1.2 million in funding from the W.M. Keck Foundation. The new technology makes use of the special characteristics of graphene, and is anticipated to have dramatic applications in artificial bionic eyes, industrial imaging, robotic vision, and medical imaging. Leading the research are professors Ted Norris, Zhaohui Zhong, and Jeff Fessler. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graphene  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lab-Systems  Medical Imaging  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Alumnus Jian-Ming Jin Honored for his Pioneering Research in Computational Electromagnetics

Prof. Jian-Ming Jin (PHD EE 1989) received the 2016 ACES Computational Electromagnetics Award from the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society for "pioneering work in the development of finite elements in electromagnetics." Prof. Jin is the Y. T. Lo Endowed Chair Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of the Electromagnetics Laboratory and Center for Computational Electromagnetics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Related Topics:  Alumni  

Alumnus Randy Haupt Honored for his Pioneering Research in Antennas

Randy L. Haupt (PhD EE 1987) received the 2016 ACES Technical Achievement Award from the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society for "pioneering application of numerical and signal processing techniques to the analysis and design of antenna arrays. Prof. Haupt is a faculty member at the Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Department at the Colorado School of Mines. He has authored books on antennas and genetic algorithms.
Related Topics:  Alumni  

How to know when your boss is lying to you

This article in Mashable describes "tells" for when someone is lying. It includes a mention of new software developed by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and her collaborators that is better able to identify deception than human observers are. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

More than 11 million HTTPS websites imperiled by new decryption attack

This article reports on the DROWN vulnerability, which allows attackers to break encryption and read or steal sensitive communications, including passwords, credit card numbers, trade secrets, or financial data. The research team who reported on DROWN are from a number of institutions around the world, including U-M. Their measurements indicate that 33% of all HTTPS servers are vulnerable to the attack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Do kids learn more when they trade in composition books for iPads?

Prof. Elliot Soloway is quotes in this Washington Post article that examines the role of technology, specifically mobile devices, in learning and education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Cutting the Cost of Hearing

Dr. Angelique Johnson (MSE PhD EE 2007 2011), founder and CEO of MEMStim, LLC, has fully automated the manufacturing process of next-generation neural devices. Her technology could dramatically reduce the cost, while improving the quality, of cochlear implants. Read the full story and watch the video by NBC Learn. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  MEMS and Microsystems  

Honglak Lee Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Assistant Professor Honglak Lee has been selected for a 2016 Sloan Research Fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for his work in deep learning and representation learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lee, Honglak  

Michael J. Cafarella Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Assistant Professor Michael J. Cafarella has been selected for a 2016 Sloan Research Fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for his work in mining and processing large and distributed datasets. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Steven Battel Elected to National Academy of Engineering

Steven J. Battel (BSE EE 1979) has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, class of 2016,"For engineering design and implementation of space flight systems." Mr. Battel is an expert on low-noise instrumentation power systems and is internationally recognized for his expertise in the design and development of space high voltage systems, especially for operation in planetary environments. He is working on a device right now that will one day land on Mars. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Passwords, Privacy and Protection: Can Apple Meet FBI Demand Without Creating a Backdoor?

Join The Conversation, in which Prof. HV Jagadish sheds some light on the issues involved in the FBI/Apple standoff over the court order to unlock a terrorism suspect's iPhone. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

MBus is the Missing Interconnect for Millimeter-Scale Systems

Looking ahead to millimeter scale computing and the future of ubiquitous computing, EECS faculty members David Blaauw, Prabal Dutta, graduate students Patrick Pannuto and Benjamin Kempke, research scientist Ye-Sheng Kuo, and a number of other Michigan researchers have created MBus, a chip-to-chip interconnect that facilitates an ultra-low power system operation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Embedded Computing and Systems  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  

ArborHacks Formed to Increase Access to and Participation in Computer Science

Computer science students have started a new U-M student organization aimed at increasing access to and participation in CS. Called ArborHacks, the group will hold a once-a-year hackathon for local high school students in addition to other events and will work with the CSE Division and other U-M entities to sponsor or support additional outreach activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Undergraduate Students  

Better Gender Balance at Latest MHacks

MHacks: Refactor took place February 19-21. This seventh version of the hackathon focused on gender equity and inclusiveness; goals it achieved by many measures. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Undergraduate Students  

Dr. Mehdi Hatamian Elected to National Academy of Engineering

Dr. Mehdi Hatamin (MSE PHD EE 1978 1982) has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, class of 2016, "For contributions to development of integrated circuits for video, communications, and digital signal processing." Dr. Hatamian is Fellow and Chief Scientist - Central Engineering at Broadcom Ltd. He received the College of Engineering Alumni Merit Award for Electrical and Computer Engineering in 2008. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Students Rewarded for Optimizing Stop/Start Technology for Auto Applications

Students in EECS 418, Prof. Heath Hofmann's Power Electronics course, competed to build the most efficient DC to DC converter as part of the course's final project. The competition was sponsored by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles; company representatives Ben Dicicco and Nazmi Sabi attended the class as guest judges. The winning teams all earned prizes sponsored by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Course  Hofmann, Heath  

Mosharaf Chowdhury Receives Google Faculty Research Award to Develop Improved Analytics for Geo-Distributed Datasets

Prof. Mosharaf Chowdhury has been awarded a 2016 Google Faculty Research Award for his work in network-aware analytics of geo-distributed datasets, with a goal of improved application-level performance. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Data Centers  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

MHacks: Refactor to Focus on Gender Inclusivity and Hacker Empowerment

MHacks is gearing up for its 7th hackathon, MHacks: Refactor, which will take place February 19-21, 2016 on University of Michigans North Campus. The hackathon is a 36-hour event that allows students, from technical and non-technical backgrounds, to create and collaborate on new projects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Undergraduate Students  

Power Harvesting Sensor Patch Uses Your Body As a Battery

IEEE Spectrum reported on a sensor patch that can power itself by using thermoelectric materials to turn the temperature difference between your body and the surrounding air into electricity. The project, based at North Caroline State University's Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors (ASSIST), involves Prof. David Wentzloff, who specializes in integrated circuit design for adaptable wireless communication systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Injectable Radios to Broadcast From Inside the Body

IEEE Spectrum reported on medical devices being developed at Michigan that may one day be small enough to go through a syringe. Professors David Blaauw and David Wentzloff are collaborating with researchers at the U-M medical school to come up with the first test application. These devices will be able to monitor oxygen, glucose, and other biometrics, or follow disease progression in tumors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

John L. Tishman, Builder Who Shaped American Skylines, Dies at 90

John L. Tishman, a master builder of the 20th century whose Tishman Realty and Construction Company transformed the skylines of Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles and New York, died on Saturday at his home in Bedford, N.Y. He was 90. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Valeria Bertacco Receives U-M Sarah Goddard Power Award

Prof. Valeria Bertacco has been selected to receive a 2016 Sarah Goddard Power Award. The award is given to a University of Michigan faculty member who demonstrates an unwavering commitment to the betterment of women and who have demonstrated a clear record of success and significant achievement in research and scholarship, distinguished leadership, and mentoring women. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Necmiye Ozay Receives CAREER Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project, "A Compositional Approach to Modular Cyber-Physical Control System Design." This research is applicable to a wide variety of safety-critical and autonomous systems, including next generation air vehicles, automotive systems, robotics and smart manufacturing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  

Al Hero gets a shoutout from the court

Alfred O. Hero, received the spotlight at Tuesday evening's basketball game against Indiana. He was recognized as part of a program to shine the light on the University's most distinguished faculty. Prof. Hero, an internationally recognized expert in the field of signal and image processing, is the R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, and co-director of the recently launched Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  

Jenna Wiens Receives NSF CAREER Award to Increase the Utility of Machine Learning in Clinical Care

Assistant Professor Jenna Wiens has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for her research project, "CAREER: Adaptable, Intelligible, and Actionable Models: Increasing the Utility of Machine Learning in Clinical Care." Under this project, she will develop data-driven predictive models to transform large and diverse datasets into actionable knowledge for improved patient care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Muzhi Wang Earns a Best Paper Award for a New Tunable Filter for Wireless Communication Devices

Muzhi Wang, third year PhD student in ECE, has earned a Best Paper Award at the 2016 Meeting on Silicon Monolithic Integrated Circuits in RF Systems (SiRF) for his implementation of the first tunable filter for wireless communications to use a germanium-telluride phase change switch. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Wireless Communications  

Hackers Tackle Assistive Technology

Dr. David Chesney and current computer science students are once again contributing to the development of assistive technology. On Thursday, January 28th, Chesney and his team launched Hacking for the Greater Good, a 6-hour hackathon that allowed students to work on projects that centered on assistive technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Hacks  Undergraduate Students  

Karl Winsor Named Churchill Scholar

Honors Mathematics and Computer Science undergraduate student Karl Winsor has been named a 2016-17 Churchill Scholar by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The award provides funding for a year of Master's study in science, mathematics, and engineering at the University of Cambridge, based at Churchill College. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Barzan Mozafari Receives NSF CAREER Award to Improve Predictability of Database Systems

Assistant Professor Barzan Mozafari has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for his research project, "CAREER: Designing a Predictable Database - An Overlooked Virtue." Under this project, Prof. Mozafari aims to restore the missing virtue of predictability in the design of database systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Databases and Data Mining  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

Gift Launches M. Alten Gilleo Distinguished Lecture Series in Optical Sciences and Optoelectronics

To honor the legacy of her late brother Mathias Alten Gilleo (BSE EE ), Anita Gilleo (BS Lit 44) has made a gift to endow the M. Alten Gilleo Distinguished Lecture Series in Optical Sciences and Optoelectronics. Her gift will give students the chance to engage with the worlds top researchers in the field of optics and optoelectronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

President Obama Announces Computer Science for All

President Obama has announced a new Computer Science for All initiative to empower all American students from kindergarten through high school to learn CS and be equipped with the computational thinking skills they need to be creators in the digital economy, not just consumers, and to be active citizens in our technology-driven world. [Full Story]

2016 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2016 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Prof. Anthony Grbic, Dr. David Paoletti, Prof. Mina Rais-Zadeh, and Prof. Thomas F. Wenisch. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Wenisch, Thomas  

Energy researchers receive $1.4 million grant

Researchers from the University, including ECE's Prof. Ian Hiskens, have received a $1.4 million grant from the Department of Energy to help develop data on power system optimization in energy grids. The team will work to develop new test cases to formulate better software algorithms for transmission operators to run the energy grid algorithms which regulate energy amounts. These operators are largely non-profit government agencies. The need for such research stems from the ongoing energy transition from traditional, emission-heavy sources such as coal and nuclear power to cleaner, renewable sources like wind and solar. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Environment  Grid  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  

Internet voting is just too hackable, say security experts

This article revisits the question of Internet voting, and reviews the reasons why these systems have been proven unreliable in the past. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, a prominent researcher in this area who has demonstrated vulnerabilities in many types of electronic voting systems, is quoted: "Imagine the incentives of a rival country to come in and change the outcome of a vote for national leadership. Elections require correct outcomes and true ballot secrecy." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Driverless cars work great in sunny California. But how about in a blizzard?

This article quotes Prof. Edwin Olson regarding the research he is doing in conjunction with Ford on autonomous vehicles and their use in conditions that include snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Three Michigan Universities Receive Pacesetters Awards to Attract More Women to Computer Science

The University of Michigan, Michigan Technological University, and Michigan State University have been selected for the National Center of Women and Information Technology Pacesetters program. Pacesetters is a 2-year program under which participating institutions develop aggressive and measurable goals for increasing the number of women in the US computing and technology workforce. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Jason Mars Receives NSF CAREER Award to Advance System Architectures for Artificially Intelligent Services and Applications

Assistant Professor Jason Mars has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for his project, CAREER: Advancing the Frontier in System Architectures for Artificially Intelligent Services and Applications. The award will enable Prof. Mars to understand how future cloud and mobile systems should be designed to support increasing demand from users of intelligent assistants. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

What good is Nanotechnology? NBC Learn brings us Jay Guo to find out

How could something only billionths of a meter thick defend against water, dirt, wear, and even bacteria? Working at the nanoscale, scientists and engineers, like Jay Guo are creating protective nanoscale coatings and layers. These surfaces have applications in energy, electronics, medicine, and could even be used to make a plane invisible. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Coolest gadget of CES 2016? I pick Avegant's Glyph

USA Today was wowed by the Glyph, a new virtual reality headset by ECE alum-founded Avegant. Allan Evans (MS PhD EE ) and Ed Tang (BSE EE ) lead the company that says it can provide the world's first personal theater. With this technology, theres no screen, no LCDs, no OLEDs, no emissive panels at all. Instead, the images are generated from reflected light, which mimics how we see the world around us. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Virtual Reality  

Secure Your Website Now: Let's Encrypt Enters Public Beta

Lets Encrypt, the free certificate authority created by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student James Kasten, recently entered Public Beta, which allows anyone to request a certificate without needing an invitation. The service was created to provide an easy way for converting webservers from HTTP to HTTPS. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Two CSE Faculty Selected for 2015-16 College of Engineering Awards

Two CSE faculty have been recognized by the College of Engineering for their extraordinary contributions: Prof. Valeria Bertacco for service and Dr. Mary Lou Dorf for teaching. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Dorf, Mary Lou  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

ECE Celebrates African American Engineers

In recognition of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and the Black History Month, ECE would like to draw attention to the many contributions made by its African American faculty and alumni. The impact of these gifted individuals spans many fields and industries. Included in the list is the first African American woman to earn a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering, and the first African American faculty member in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  Winful, Herbert  

Somin Lee Receives AFOSR Young Investigator Award for Research in Bioplasmonics

Prof. Somin Eunice Lee received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to support research that will ultimately help our basic understanding of how tissues form distinct shapes and structure to become organs, such as lungs, salivary glands, and mammary glands. This understanding will facilitate new strategies to engineer replacement tissues. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lee, Somin E.  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Robert J. Armantrout Establishes ECE Graduate Education Fund

Robert J. Armantrout (BSE EE 1976) of Santa Clara, CA, has established the Robert J. Armantrout Endowed Fellowship Fund. The Fund will provide merit-based support to graduate students studying Electrical and Computer Engineering. Mr. Armantrout spent much of his career on RF test and measurement for the wireless community. He is currently a consultant at RedwoodRF, specializing in the wireless and RF domains. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Lees Make Gift to Empower CSE Student Activities

Dr. Peter Lee (BS MS PhD CCS 82, 82, 87) and Susan Lee have made a $25,000 discretionary gift for student activities to CSE. With their gift, the Lees aim to provide the opportunity to support CSE students to do and achieve more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

EECS Alumnus Leads $10M NSF Expeditions Project for Synthetic Biology

Douglas Densmore (BSE CE 01), Associate Prof. of ECE at Boston University, will lead the Living Computing Project, an effort to create a toolbox of catalogued biological parts that can be used to engineer organisms with predictable results. These parts will allow the entire field to understand better what computing principles can be applied repeatedly and reliably to synthetic biology. The project is funded under a $10 million National Science Foundation (NSF) "Expeditions in Computing" grant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Kamal Sarabandi Receives Stephen S. Attwood Award

Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, received the Stephen S. Attwood award, which is the highest honor awarded to a faculty member by the College of Engineering. It recognizes "extraordinary achievement in teaching, research, service, and other activities that have brought distinction to the College and University." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Nadkarni Gift Invests in Student Entrepreneurs

Shirish Nadkarni (BSE EE 82) and his wife Manisha Nadkarni, of Medina, Washington, have made an expendable gift to be used at the discretion of the chair of the CSE Division. Its purpose is to support student teams in junior/senior-level project-oriented courses in CSE in which students develop software and hardware prototypes, many of which have commercial potential. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Even your academic advisor might one day be a robot

This article in Engadget highlights the new research collaboration between Michigan and IBM, which is aimed at building a conversationally-driven, artificially intelligent academic advisor that guides undergraduate students through their course options [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

U-M, IBM Partner on Advanced Conversational Computing System

The University of Michigan and IBM have launched a $4.5 million collaboration to develop a new class of conversational technologies that will enable people to interact more naturally and effectively with computers. Under the project, the researchers will develop a cognitive system that functions as an academic advisor for undergraduate computer science and engineering majors at the university. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lasecki, Walter  Lee, Honglak  Mars, Jason  Mihalcea, Rada  Mower Provost, Emily  Radev, Dragomir  Tang, Lingjia  

Cafarella and Lee Named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professors

Michael Cafarella and Honglak Lee, assistant professors in Computer Science and Engineering, have been named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professors. The professorship is awarded to junior faculty members in recognition of outstanding contributions to teaching and research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lee, Honglak  

Kevin Fu Named a Top Influencer in Health Information Security

Prof. Kevin Fu has been named to the 2016 list of Top Influencers in Healthcare Information Security by HealthcareInfoSecurity. This list recognizes leaders who are playing significant roles in shaping the way healthcare organizations approach information security and privacy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Censys Enables Fast Searching of Actionable Internet Data

CSE researchers have introduced Censys, a search engine that enables researchers to ask questions about the hosts and networks that compose the Internet and get an immediate reply. Censys builds on past work at Michigan that produced the first fast Internet-wide scanner, ZMap. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security (Computing)  

Cybersecurity Startup QuadMetrics Calculates Odds a Company Will be Breached

As reported by the Wall Street Journal, QuadMetrics Inc. says it can predict with greater than 90% accuracy the likelihood that a company will be breached within the next year. QuadMetrics cloud service determines the probability of a breach at a particular company by collecting from its network more than 250 different data points. The company was co-founded by Prof. Mingyan Liu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  

The Story of a Digital Teddy Bear Shows How College Learning Is Changing

This story highlights the changing nature of education, driven in part by computationally-enabled entrepreneurship. Hackathons such as MHacks at U-M and other "outside the classroom" activities have created new opportunities for students to manage their own educations. The digital teddy bears highlighted in the story came to life as a project at MHacks 6. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  

A Journey from the Ibn Sina School to Graduate School at U-M

Sherin Hazboun has had many obstacles in her life, but that has not deterred her from moving abroard to pursue her degree in computer science. She was in the first cohort of students that Prof. Karem Sakallah taught at the Ibn Sina School for Computer Science, an institution in Palestine that was launched in 2012. Since then he has been her mentor, leading her to the University of Michigan, where she is currently pursuing her masters degree in CSE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Sakallah, Karem  

Researchers make progress on holy grail of autonomous vehicles: driving in snow

This story by Michigan Radio talks about testing autonomous cars on snow covered roads. The new research was done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford. The new research shows it's possible for a self-driving car to get around using highly detailed 3D maps of everything that surrounds the vehicle. The news was also featured in their top of the hour news summary, please click here to listen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Prof. Anthony Grbic Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to the Theory and Design of Electromagnetic Metamaterials

Prof. Anthony Grbic has been elected IEEE Fellow, "for contributions to the theory and design of electromagnetic metamaterials." He has created radically new antennas and optical devices based on the development of novel metamaterials and metasurfaces. His research could pave the way for flat/low profile, integrated optical devices, as well as new generations of wireless consumer electronics and mobile devices that are either smaller or more versatile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Metamaterials  

Fairy doors appear on University of Michigan's North Campus

San Francisco's SF Gate has noted the appearance of Fairy Doors on North Campus, including the first -- discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea -- which was found in CSE's Beyster Building. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Mihalcea, Rada  

Ford tests driverless cars in snow at U-M's Mcity

This article in MLive covers work done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford at Mcity, in which the researchers have tested new technology that allows autonomous vehicles to navigate on snow-covered streets. Their solution combines live LIDAR data with learned 3D map stores to enable the systems to compute location and to drive successfully. It is believed that this is the first test to address the challenges of snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

U-M, Ford are First to Address Autonomous Driving on Snow-Covered Roads

Researchers at U-M and Ford have tested new technology that allows autonomous vehicles to navigate on snow-covered streets. Their solution combines live LIDAR data with learned 3D map stores to enable the systems to compute location and to drive successfully. It is believed that this is the first test to address the challenges of snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Inventive thinkers at NREL reach record number, including a shutoff idea designed to keep firefighters safer from an ECE alum

Chris Deline (BSE MSE PhD EE 03 05 08), a research engineer in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's photovoltaic performance and reliability group, has designed a concept for a "PV Module-Level Remote Safety Disconnect." The idea is to keep firefighters out of harm's way when they're called to a home with rooftop solar panels, which are normally much more difficult to cut power to in emergency situations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Solar Cell Technology  

Chevy Bolt electric car could be the first mass-market EV success

ECE alumnus Andy Farah did great things as lead designer of the Chevrolet Volt, GM's successful plug-in hybrid vehicle. Now he's unveiling the Chevy Bolt, a concept all-electric car that will be capable of traveling 200 miles between charges and that will sell in the low $30,000 range. This could transform the prospects for widespread adoption of electric cars. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  

Fairy doors appearing on U-M's North Campus

This story in MLive reports on the recent appearances of Fairy Doors on North Campus. The first, discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea, was found in CSE's Beyster Building. Since then, the story reports, two more have been found in the Chrysler Center. We're glad the fairies have come to stay! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Mihalcea, Rada  

Elementary Programming Class Introduces Students to Coding

This story in The Michigan Daily highlights EECS 183, the introductory CS course taught by Dr. Mary Lou Dorf, who designed the class to be experiential and to provide the support for students to become both familiar with computing concepts and more confident in their ability to learn to code. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  

Googling the Physical World

David Wentzloff wants to get rid of batteries and build the Internet of Things - a "Google of the physical world." This undertaking will use trillions of tiny sensors embedded in everything you can think of, communicating wirelessly. With his company PsiKick, David hopes to provide the technology that makes it happen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Fall 2015 Computer Games Showcase Highlights Over 20 New Games

On Friday, December 18th, Tishman Hall in the Beyster Building had a large crowd of over 100 attendees for the Fall 2015 Computer Games Showcase. The event showcased the final projects of computer science seniors in EECS 494, Computer Game Design and Development, which is taught by Jeremy Gibson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bond, Jeremy  Computer Games  Undergraduate Students