Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE Research News

New Funding for High-Fidelity Nerve Mapping Research

The NIH's Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC) program awarded a U-M project $1 million in funding to develop highly-compliant microneedle arrays for peripheral nerve mapping. The team's project director and principal investigator is John Seymour. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  MEMS and Microsystems  Optoelectronics  Yoon, Euisik  

U-M Receives $1.6M Toward Artificial Intelligence for Data Science

A team from the University of Michigan has received $1.6 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to help develop a toolkit so that anyone can use big data to help answer questions and ultimately speed up the process of discovery. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  

Cooling off with Lasers

Prof. Stephen Rand and his team are studying how to use lasers to cool down solid matter. Besides breaking common notions about lasers, there are several applications for the refrigeration of solids with light. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Precise pulses explore light's magnetism

A new laser will investigate an unusual magnetic effect that may lead to efficient solar energy harvesting. The new laser facility is housed in the Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO), directed by Prof. Stephen Rand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Rand, Stephen  

Doubling the power of the world's most intense laser

The most intense laser in the world is about to get a power upgrade with $2 million from the National Science Foundation. With more laser energy to focus, researchers at the University of Michigan and collaborators from around the world can make better tabletop devices that produce particle and X-ray beams for medical and national security applications and also explore mysteries in astrophysics and the quantum realm [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS)  HERCULES  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  Maksimchuk, Anatoly  Nees, John A.  Optics and Photonics  Willingale, Louise  

Precision Health at Michigan

Learn more about Michigan's new initiative to lead in precision health: using advanced tools and technology to provide personalized solutions to improve an individual's health and wellness. Lead by co-director Eric Michielssen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Big Data  Health  Michielssen, Eric  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Using University of Michigan buildings as batteries

Michigan researchers and staff are testing how to use the immense thermal energy of large buildings as theoretical battery packs. The goal is to help the nations grid better accommodate renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Hiskens, Ian  Infrastructure  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power and Energy  Sustainability  

Getting People Moving: Walking Exoskeletons Could Mobilize Disabled Patients

PhD student Omar Harib, postdoctoral researcher Ayonga Hereid, and PhD student Eva Mungai spent four days in July working with French company Wandercraft in Paris. The company's goal is to create an exoskeleton that will allow patients that are paralyzed from the waist down to walk upright, with a natural gait and the freedom to use their hands. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Health  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

BigANT Tackles the Wave Field

Prof. Shai Revzen's lab has developed an inexpensive technique to rapidly fabricate a variety of useful robots, requiring only their modules and two stock materials. One of the lab's modular bots, BigANT, just received a major redesign that lets it walk over grass, up hills, and across uneven surfaces. It took on north campus' biggest terrain challenge, the Wave Field, in this new video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain

A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists. The technology exists to stimulate and map circuits in the brain, but neuroscientists have yet to tap this potential. Now, developers of these technologies are coming together to demonstrate and share them to drive a rapid advance in our understanding of the brain, funded by $7.75 million from the National Science Foundation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  Yoon, Euisik  

Seeing through materials with visible light

With yogurt and crushed glass, Prof. Raj Nadakuditi's group have taken a step toward using visible light to image inside the body. Their method for focusing light through these materials is much faster and simpler than today's dominant approach. By understanding exactly how a patch of skin scatters the light, researchers hope to carefully pattern light beams so that they focus inside the bodya first step toward seeing into it. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  Medical Imaging  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  Norris, Theodore B.  

Dmitry Berenson Helps Robots Play Nice with People (with Video)

Prof. Dmitry Berenson wants robots to help us out anywhere, any time. In order to do so, he's working with state of the art equipment to design algorithms for robotic manipulation. These algorithms could turn a hunk of metal into a useful household assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Next-gen computing inspired by biology

Inspired by how mammals see, a new memristor computer circuit prototype developed by Prof. Wei Lu has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude faster and with much less power than todays most advanced systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Zhang, Zhengya  

Sister cell profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

In work that could improve understanding of how cancer spreads, a team of engineers and medical researchers at the University of Michigan including Prof. Euisik Yoon developed a new kind of microfluidic chip that can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip and release single cells on demand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Yoon, Euisik  

Shai Revzen part of a new five-institution MURI focused on the control of dynamic systems

Prof. Shai Revzen is a member of a five-institution team that will take advantage of recent advances in computation to exploit the promise of the Koopman Theory for modeling and control of dynamic systems.

The research is funded under a $6.25 million, five-year Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI) based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and called From Data-Driven Operator Theoretic Schemes to Prediction, Inference and Control of Systems (DDOTS to PICS). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Lab-Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Building More Stable Quadruped Robots: A Dog's Point of View

Research into the gait of dogs may lead to improved design of quadruped robots and how we control their movement. Shai Revzen, a biologist turned roboticist, brings a unique perspective to the study of animals, one thats beginning to be heard by the biological community as well. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

How to Build a BigANT Shai Revzen's Critter-Inspired Robots

Want to build your own robot fast and cheap? Shai Revzen is making that easier with his plate and reinforced flexure (PARF) fabrication technique. He used PARF to develop the meter-scale hexapedal robot known as BigANT, whose design files are available to all. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterials

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down by Prof. Jay Guo, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made. It could also help improve computing power, affecting both the transfer of information within a silicon chip and the patterning of the chip itself through metamaterial superlenses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Ultrashort light pulses for fast 'lightwave' computers

Extremely short, configurable "femtosecond" pulses of light demonstrated by an international team could lead to future computers that run up to 100,000 times faster than today's electronics. Prof. Mack Kira showed that we can control the peaks within the laser pulses and also twist the light. This is a step toward so-called "lightwave electronics" and, in the more distant future, quantum computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kira, Mackillo  Optics and Photonics  Quantum Computing  Quantum Science and Technology  

Cindy Finelli: Community Building And Envisioning The Future Of Engineering Education Research

Prof. Cindy Finelli was highlighted as a pioneer of engineering education for her work in community building and education research. She is part of a new initiative at U-M to include education research in engineering departments. She is also the Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Gopal Nataraj Receives U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to Support High-impact Research in Medical Imaging

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, received a U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research that promises to lead to improved techniqes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program whose research is unusually creative, ambitious and impactful. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Michigan's Millimeter-Scale Computers featured at ISSCC2017, and in IEEE Spectrum

Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester presented a total of 10 papers at the 2017 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). Most were related to their Michigan Micro Mote (M3) computers. Their goal is to make smarter, smaller sensors for medical devices and the Internet of Things that can do more with less energy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Snow science in action

Using high-tech equipment like infrared sensors and low-tech gear like shovels, researchers are trying to determine what remote sensors could best be used on satellites to produce more accurate snowpack measurements around the world. ECE grad student Mohammad Mousavi is working on Grand Mesa with a University of Michigan boom truck parked at the Jumbo Campground by Mesa Lakes and outfitted with a microwave radiometer, one type of snowpack measurement device. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

CASSIE: A Tougher, Lighter Bipedal Robot with Eyes

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Mingyan Liu: Confessions of a Pseudo Data Scientist

Prof. Mingyan Liu gives the lecture "Confessions of a Pseudo Data Scientist" at the Women in Data Science Conference hosted by MIDAS. Prof. Lius research interests include optimal resource allocation, sequential decision theory, incentive design, and performance modeling and analysis, all within the context of communications networks. Her most recent research involves online learning, modeling and mining of large-scale internet measurement data concerning cyber-security, and incentive mechanisms for interdependent security games. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  

U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous 'bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Becky Peterson Receives NSF CAREER Award for Research in Amorphous Semiconductors for Next Generation Electronics

Prof. Becky Peterson was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project entitled Band Engineering in Amorphous Semiconductors." She will develop new alloys of amorphous oxide semiconductors with precisely tuned semiconductor energy band structures in order to enable new categories of electronic and opto-electronic devices. This research is applicable to the next generation of high-power electronics and deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices, with specific applications in renewable energy and health care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optoelectronics  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Kamal Sarabandi | Remote Sensing Science and Technology

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi delivered a Geoscience Remote Sensing Seminar, titled "Remote Sensing Science and Technology in Support of Exploration and Safe Utilization of Energy Resources." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mark Kushner | The Role of Plasma Modeling

Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the Keynote Address at the 2016 LNF Users Symposium, titled The Role of Plasma Modeling in the Innovation Cycle for Nanofabrication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

$1.1 million grant to develop robot emergency response capabilities

The Office of Naval Research has awarded Prof. Dmitry Berenson $1.1 million to help advance a robot's ability to walk over unstable ground and deal with tangles in string, rope or wire. One of the new abilities that Berenson and his group will help robots attain is navigating unfamiliar environments by reusing previous experience from similar environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Video: The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility is a state-of- the-art cleanroom that provides advanced micro- and nano-fabrication equipment and expertise to internal and external researchers. The LNF enables cutting edge research, including semiconductor materials and devices, electronic circuits, solid-state lighting, energy, biotechnology, medical devices and unconventional materials and processing technologies. Learn more in this video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Najafi, Khalil  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  

Ushering in the Next Generation of Flat-Panel Displays and Medical Imagers

Research that is expected to directly impact the future of the flat-panel display and imager industries has been selected as an Editor's Choice by the Journal of Solid-State Electronics. The article, co-authored by Prof. Jerzy Kanicki, ECE graduate student Chumin Zhao, and Dr. Mitsuru Nakata, describes a new technology that may help usher in the next generation of flat-panel displays and imagers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Kanicki, Jerzy  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Video: Prof. Cindy Finelli and Engineering Education Research

Prof. Finelli is currently Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering, and she was founding director at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching in Engineering at Michigan, which supports college-wide initiatives in engineering teaching and learning. Her own research focuses on how faculty make decisions about what theyre doing in the classroom, how students understand engineering concepts, and how a flexible classroom influences both teaching and learning. Watch a new video about her and her work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Solving the "Christmas light" problem so solar panels can handle shade

Just 10 percent shade cover can create a 50 percent drop in solar panel electricity production. Prof. Al-Thaddeus Avestrus is working to ensure power produced by a solar panel reflects the average over all the cells. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  Sustainability  

COVE: A Tool for Advancing Progress in Computer Vision

A new project has been launched to provide open and easy access to up-to-date, varied, data sets, annotations and their relevant tools. Based at the University of Michigan with collaborators at Boston University and the University of Notre Dame, the program aims to centralize available data in the intelligent systems community through a COmputer Vision Exchange for Data, Annotations and Tools, called COVE. The project promises to have an immediate and far-reaching impact on the computer vision community as well as researchers involved in machine learning, multimedia, natural language processing, data mining, and information retrieval. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new device for studying tumor cells can trap 10,000 individual cells in a single chip. The technique, developed by Prof. Euisik Yoon's group, could one day help screen potential cancer treatments based on an individual patients tumor and help researchers better understand so-called cancer stem cells. It also shed light on a controversy: are large cells or small cells more likely to be cancer stem cells? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

Hacking Healthcare - How Big Data is Driving Big Changes in Medicine

The article by CoE writer Gabe Cherry highlights the work being done by Jenna Wiens and her collaborators on using big data to predict which hospital patients are at risk of developing a life-threatening intestinal infection called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. It also provides context on the big data initiatives taking at UM in general and with respect to healthcare, and across EECS, including work by Prof. Barzan Mozafari on how to improve the design of big data databases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Michielssen, Eric  Mower Provost, Emily  Mozafari, Barzan  Wiens, Jenna  

Necmiye Ozay Receives NASA Early Career Faculty Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a NASA Early Career Faculty award for her project, "Run-time anomaly detection and mitigation in information-rich cyber-physical systems." Her research will be designed to assist in future missions in space, while being applicable to a wide range of cyber-physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Space technology  

Solar power plant: $1.4M grant aims to cut costs

Nanotechnology could reduce the cost of the most expensive part of a solar thermal power plant by roughly 75 percent. The Department of Energy gave a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, the University of Michigan and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory $1.4 million to develop new solar concentrators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  

Pioneering Engineering Education Research

A new initiative at the College of Engineering has brought U-M into the spotlight in the field of Engineering Education Research (EER). Spearheaded by Prof. David C. Munson, Jr. while he was Dean, the College took a unique approach to EER by embedding faculty directly into traditional engineering departments. A few other institutions had already developed standalone departments or schools for EER with their own sets of faculty and PhD students, but U-Ms approach is the first of its kind. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

Since he received a robot capable of walking outside, Jessy Grizzle has heard the siren call of the Wave Field, the undulating earthen art installation outside the Franois-Xavier Bagnoud building. MARLO finally got her shot at it. For now, Jessy and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that Grizzle calls merely very difficult. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

A Bipedal Robot Gets Its Swagger On

Popular Science watches MARLO take a stroll across the wave field for the first time. "She's trained her whole life for this moment: MARLO recently stomped and stumbled her way through a new milestone at University of Michigan's Wave Field. The field an art installation turned robot testing ground offers new challenges for the bipedal robot's lateral and forward balance, because of its uneven terrain." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

MARLO the bipedal robot seems to be tipsy

MARLO has captured worldwide attention again with her exploration of the wave field on North Campus. As she tries to navigate the steep bumps with no sensors, just extraordinarily clever algorithms that have her adapting to what she "steps in," she appears to be, well, a bit drunk. This drunken behavior is just MARLO pushing the extremes of what a human-sized bipedal robot can do. See her on Gizmodo, Aol.On and MSN Video
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Two Michigan Papers Win Top Awards at IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium

Two papers authored by EECS researchers were selected for top honors at the 37th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. One of the papers, describing and demonstrating a malicious hardware backdoor, received the Distinguished Paper Award. The second, which demonstrated security failings in a commercial smart home platform, received the Distinguished Practical Paper Award. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Hicks, Matt  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

A New, Low-Cost Way to Monitor Snow and Ice Thickness to Evaluate Environmental Change

Mohammad Mousavi, PhD student in ECE, earned a Weisnet Medal at the Eastern Snow Conference for his paper Elevation Angular Dependence of Wideband Autocorrelation Radiometric (WiBAR) Remote Sensing of Dry Snowpack and Lake Icepack, co-authored by Dr. Roger De Roo, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi, and Prof. Anthony England. The Weisnet Medal is presented to the best student paper at the conference. Mohammad has developed a new way to remotely measure the thickness of ice and snow with a technology he calls wideband autocorrelation radiometry (WiBAR), offering lower cost, lower power, and more flexibility than competing methods. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  England, Anthony W.  Environment  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

An Award Winning Radar System for Collision Avoidance and Imaging

Armin Jam, doctoral student in ECE, took first place in the student paper competition at the 2016 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation (AP-S) for his paper, "A Horizontally Polarized Beam-Steerable Antenna for Sub-millimeter-wave Polarimetric Imaging and Collision Avoidance Radars," co-authored by his advisor, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi. Armins research is focused on the development of a sub-millimeter-wave (sub-MMW) radar system for the next generation of navigation and imaging sensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Autonomous Vehicles  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

A New Way to Test Low-Frequency Antennas for Long-Range Communication

Jihun Choi, a doctoral student in Prof. Kamal Sarabandi's research group, has earned an honorable mention in the 2016 IEEE Symposium on Antennas and Propagation Student Paper Competition. His paper describes a new technique to test antennas for long-range communication applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Two Papers by Michigan Researchers Chosen as IEEE Micro Top Picks

Two papers authored by EECS researchers have been selected for IEEE Micro's Top Picks from the 2015 Computer Architecture Conferences. The two papers from Michigan introduced the Sirius personal digital assistant and the MBus bus for modular microcomputing systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Dutta, Prabal  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Mudge, Trevor  Tang, Lingjia  

U-M cyber security startup purchased by FICO

QuadMetrics, a cyber risk security startup co-founded by Prof. Mingyan Liu, announced it has been purchased. Analytic software company FICO of San Jose, Calif., bought QuadMetrics to help in its development of a FICO Enterprise Security Score. The scores will rank an organization's level of cyber security risk, the company said in a statement. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  Technology Transfer  

Injectable Computers Can Broadcast from Inside the Body

Profs. David Blaauw and David Wenzloff are designing millimeter-scale ultra-low-power sensing systems that can be injected into the body through a syringe. Unlike other radios of this size, these new devices are able to broadcast through the human body to an external receiver. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

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